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Rick
Administrator

USA
19830 Posts

Posted - 11/20/2010 :  1:03:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dallas, excellent modeling and a very nice tribute to your friend.

As you think, so will you be.
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Frederic Testard
Engineer

France
17658 Posts

Posted - 11/20/2010 :  6:16:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Another great progress, Dallas, and some new interesting finds, with these Ngineering wires that look perfect for this kind of work. I browsed their site and was amazed by what I saw. Thanks for sharing.

Frederic Testard
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dallas_m
Fireman

USA
4271 Posts

Posted - 11/21/2010 :  07:38:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


I mentioned the Reaper Miniatures "Master Series" paints before and said that I was looking forward to trying their metallics ... finally had a chance to do a "little" bit of that on a small number of small pieces ...

They also have a variety of "brighter" metallics, but I chose these figuring the subdued tones would be a safer bet for the projects at hand.



Here are the same colors in the same order ... for reference, the porcelain dish really is an off-white or linen color ... and, yes, the first two are quite similar. The Reaper Master Series paints have fine pigments and come in little dropper bottles like the Vallejo paints ... and they have some very nice colors, including some excellent skin tones ... so they make a nice compliment to the Vallejo range.

I've been getting them from www.MiniatureMarket.com -- not affiliated with those guys, but they carry both Reaper and Vallejo at a good discount with excellent service.



The "before" shot: A while back, I painted an assortment of the Vector Cut tools in grays, rusts and also in the cruddy looking silver finish shown here. The tools shown above were done with Testor's silver spray paint and a couple other colors misted on ... and the speckly/sparkly finish was rather disappointing. [:-crazy]



The "after" shot: Thinned the Reaper paints a bit with wet water and dry-time extender ... laid out the tools on some Scotch Magic Tape ... and lightly brushed over them with the various metallics shown. Dipped the brush freely between the various colors, sort of randomly intermixing them. This was another occasion to enjoy one of the Kolinsky sable brushes. The #0 brush was small enough to do these quite easily without obscuring any detail.



Here's a side-by-side comparison of the "before" and "after" appearance. Much happier now!



Previous shots were about 4x actual size on a 19" monitor ... this one is about 2x actual. Think these will do fine. To my eye, they look like "metal" but have a subdued tone that should work well ...

Also have some of the Reaper "Tarnished Brass" to try ... but didn't have any brass tools for this round! So we'll just have to try that another time ... [:-knockout]

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!
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Frederic Testard
Engineer

France
17658 Posts

Posted - 11/24/2010 :  6:42:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave's tools are really something to see. Making such a carving job on minuscule parts like this is really fabulous. And your work on them still improves the look of these parts.
Dave is certainly one of the - if not simply "the" - most creative manufacturer in the hobby today.

Frederic Testard
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dallas_m
Fireman

USA
4271 Posts

Posted - 12/05/2010 :  09:54:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote


Howdy! Been a while since the last update, so thought it might be nice to check in with everyone. It's the "crazy busy season" where I work ... [;-xmas] [;-xmas] [;-xmas] ... so I'm just taking a little break here and there to work on some details parts and such to keep things going.

Took apart a couple cheap die-cast vehicles to harvest parts. Above left is a "wooden" wheel from a truck. Center: Shaved off the lip that held a rubber tire, drilled out the axle hole, drilled holes for lug nuts, roughed up the wood spokes a bit and added some styrene strip around the outside to make tire-mounting rims. Still have to shape those a bit. Should end up looking a bit like the prototype on right ... without a tire.



Wanted a spoked wheel to hang on the back wall too ... but the wheels from the die-cast Model A that got pillaged didn't look so good (yellow wheel in foreground). Remembered a 1/24 Harley that had been picked up cheap ... that's obviously too much bike for little ole Mr. Mudgeon there ... BUT the wheels are the same size and the spokes look a lot better ...



Opened up the axle hole ... carved the hub or center of wheel a bit to reveal more spoke ... and added another layer of spokes with styrene rod to make it look more like the prototype. Would look better if scratchbuilt with finer wire ... but, heck, this is just a background object ... so we'll just try some judicious weathering and/or highlighting to see what we can do when it's painted.



The muffler on the die-cast Model A was molded into the plastic chassis. It was a bit lumpy and bumpy after it was carved free, but had the distinctive shape of a Model A muffler. Smoothed out the muffler a bit, made a new tailpipe from brass rod and added a little mounting flange on the end that attaches to the exhaust header ...

So as the [;-xmas] season draws ever nearer, we'll just take a little break here and there to prep some other parts, maybe do some painting on these ... or possibly work on some figures ...



Speaking of figures ... turns out this lovely lady is Millie Adams, the new school teacher, and she's just "stopped by" to introduce herself.

Millie has a bunch of crazy relatives who live across the state .. and she's invited her favorite niece Ginger to make the move to the new town with her. She thinks her niece will do better away from her folks, who don't really have their act together too well ... and Ginger really admires her aunt's independent style.

Of course, Miss Adams won't be mentioning any of this to Mr. Mudgeon just yet ... she's heard about him. No, she's just stopping by to say "hello."

Oddly enough, Mr. Mudgeon isn't in a terrible hurry to get back to work and replace that exhaust system. Seems he'd rather be "neighborly" and chat a bit. Upon learning that Millie lives up the road at the old Wilson place, he notes that it's a fair pace to the schoolhouse and she confides that her old car just barely survived the move ... and it might be a while before she can afford to have it fixed up.

Mudgeon thinks for a moment ... takes a look at that muffler that needs replacing ... and casually mentions that he's got to go up the road in the tow truck to fetch a repair at the mining company. He adds that he might have a few minutes to stop on the way back and have a look at that car.

Millie says that would be awfully nice of him and walks on up the road just a bit to meet her niece, whom she instructed to wait outside.

Meanwhile, good ole Mudgeon hurriedly packs a toolbox onto the back of the truck and calls ahead to the mining company to let them know he'll be up there sooner than expected.

Ginger asks her aunt, "How did it go?"

Millie just smirks a little. Yup, she'd heard of this Mudgeon character and decided to start off easy ... no sense in firing both barrels at once ... until you know you've got a clear shot.

I wonder what Mr. Mudgeon's getting himself into here. Hmm ....

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!
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Ensign
Fireman

Canada
5205 Posts

Posted - 12/05/2010 :  11:33:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dallas,
you forgot to say,will Mudgeon get Miss Millie Adam's motor purring? Will Ginger's head find a body? Tune in next time for the adventures of Mr. Mudgeon in Chambers Gas & Oil.

Greg Shinnie

Edited by - Ensign on 12/05/2010 2:13:08 PM
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dallas_m
Fireman

USA
4271 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2010 :  01:08:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dallas_m





Opened up the axle hole ... carved the hub or center of wheel a bit to reveal more spoke ... and added another layer of spokes with styrene rod to make it look more like the prototype. Would look better if scratchbuilt with finer wire ... but, heck, this is just a background object ... so we'll just try some judicious weathering and/or highlighting to see what we can do when it's painted.


Well, this will come as no surprise ... but "someone" just couldn't live with that wheel with the big ugly plastic spokes. [:-blindfold]



Will post some larger pix on this one ... just in case there are some other crazies out there who can't stand big clunky spokes and wanna try this! (Where the heck is the Steve Martin smilie with an arrow thru the head?)

Above left is the original plastic wheel with a little bit of drilling/carving to open up the spokes and reduce the center hub to the raised ridge. At right, half of the spokes have been trimmed away. This holds the thing together well enough to start installing the new spokes ... lightly scribe the position of each spoke on the outside edge BEFORE cutting them away. This makes it easier to drill the rim later for installation of the new spokes. (Scribing works ... pencil marks get rubbed off ... ask me how I know!)



The center / front-most spoke in each set goes into the raised hub, per the prototype shown below. On this particular wheel, the rear layer of spokes just lays on the ridge as shown at right. Guess that'll depend on the particular casting ...



The spokes in the middle layer were done one-by-one ... trim away a plastic spoke ... drill for the new spoke ... install that and go on to the next. NOW it's starting to look a lot more like it should!



Drilled some holes in the hub for lug nuts, then added some styrene strip around the outside edge ... that's not shown here, but done the same as shown on wood-spoked wheel shown previously. Let that set, then shaped the styrene strip to form a mounting bead and used gap-filling ACC to make a fillet between that and the recessed wheel surface ...



Wheel with base coat of black and showing rim with added mounting beads (ridges? whachamacallum?) around the edges ...

Expect the layout/diorama to be set in 1942 or 1943 ... so the War Production Board has decreed that bad little boys and girls will NOT be allocated the traditional lump of coal in their stockings. Looks like Mr. Mudgeon will be getting a dirty old oil pan instead! [;-xmas]

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!
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anders
Section Hand

Sweden
72 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2010 :  02:49:32 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dallas,

Excellent work and I mean everything. Just discovered this thread and will follow along with great interest. First rate[:-bigeyes][:-bigeyes]

Anders
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Frederic Testard
Engineer

France
17658 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2010 :  03:07:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Superb work again, Dallas. Now this is a great project, with so many innovative approaches. I love it!

Frederic Testard
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Neil M
Fireman

Australia
2271 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2010 :  05:03:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice modelling. I especially like the looks of the new wheel with the wire spokes

Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia
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wesleybeks
Fireman

South Africa
2541 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2010 :  06:47:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
More top notch modelling Dallas.

It all looks great.

Regards
Wes
Modelling in sunny South Africa
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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

USA
11066 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2010 :  07:45:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Awesome Dallas!

Mike
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visman48
Fireman

USA
5362 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2010 :  08:11:27 AM  Show Profile  Visit visman48's Homepage  Click to see visman48's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote
Dallas
Your a more talented man than me..and gutsy too. I am sure I wouldn't have tried the respoking of the rim, but it sure looks darn nice. Now I supose you have a inner tube for that rim and tire, and you are going to inflate that inner tube with some sore small aircompressor or hand pump?

Les

My forum build links;
Big Horn and Moose Creek :http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22704&whichpage=1
Locomotives: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=20279
Railcars: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=17827
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BBLmber
Fireman

USA
4707 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2010 :  12:07:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Keep it going Dallas.[:-thumbu][:-thumbu]

Mark

W,L,&E
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dallas_m
Fireman

USA
4271 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2010 :  1:41:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by visman48

Dallas
Your a more talented man than me..and gutsy too. I am sure I wouldn't have tried the respoking of the rim, but it sure looks darn nice. Now I supose you have a inner tube for that rim and tire, and you are going to inflate that inner tube with some sore small aircompressor or hand pump?

Les



I remember admiring some wire wheels that one modeler very skillfully scratchbuilt and thinking that I'd never attempt that!

Figured these photos might be useful to others, because it's a way to sort of "cheat" and use some of the original plastic spokes to hold the rim and hub in place while installing the metal spokes. I'll try it again on some 1/35 motorcycle wheels, which would be about the same size as 1/48 auto wheels ... will post pix whenever that happens.

And, yes, there actually are a couple of compressors ... have a plastic one and a resin one to choose from ... and I think [;-xmas] might be bringing me a "motorcyle repair" set that even includes a hand pump.

Little bit of snow here today ... just might have to goof off a bit more!

Cheers,
Dallas

Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build
Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor!
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