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hon3_rr
Fireman

USA
7124 Posts

Posted - 09/05/2008 :  4:35:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
David, Thanks for posting your pics of your build. When I scrolled down to the storage shed, I said "Wow!!" out loud, and I normally don't talk to myself. Very well done! I would love to see some of your current work as you say that you have improved, so I do hope that you will share your knowledge, techniques and pictures on your Twin Mills build. Again, thanks for sharing these pictures with us..

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.
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hon3_rr
Fireman

USA
7124 Posts

Posted - 09/05/2008 :  4:40:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Mikie... Try it... you'll like it. (It does make a difference!)

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.
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hon3_rr
Fireman

USA
7124 Posts

Posted - 09/05/2008 :  11:51:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
MikeC;
In your FSM Engine House build you used "Gallery Glass - Liquid Leading" in the stone work joint sections. I picked up a bottle of 'Black' from my local Michaels Craft store yesterday. I'm thinking a little ahead here, but when you apply it to stone work, how did you keep it from running a little out of control into and following the mortar spaces between stones? I want to use it on the cookhouse which joins to the back of the barn section. The cookhouse is resin castings representing stone walls. I further noted that you toned it down with chalk once dry. Also, any hints as to a thinner for this product if needed?

Please, if anyone else has some experience with this, feel free to speak up as I'm a little concerned here. Thanks in advance.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 09/06/2008 12:01:49 AM
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hunter48820
Fireman

USA
6117 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2008 :  02:49:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great work Mike. I really like Blue Sky and its detail!

Look out for #1, but don't step in #2!

Andy Keeney
Dewitt, MI
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Peterpools
Engineer

USA
12335 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2008 :  06:37:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit Peterpools's Homepage  Reply with Quote
KP
The signage looks terrific and without question, thanks for the excellent tutorial.
Peter [:-kitty]
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MikeC
Administrator

USA
21584 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2008 :  10:28:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by hon3_rr

MikeC;
In your FSM Engine House build you used "Gallery Glass - Liquid Leading" in the stone work joint sections. I picked up a bottle of 'Black' from my local Michaels Craft store yesterday. I'm thinking a little ahead here, but when you apply it to stone work, how did you keep it from running a little out of control into and following the mortar spaces between stones? I want to use it on the cookhouse which joins to the back of the barn section. The cookhouse is resin castings representing stone walls. I further noted that you toned it down with chalk once dry. Also, any hints as to a thinner for this product if needed?



Kris, as it comes out of the bottle, the Liquid Leading I have is fairly thick and not at all runny. I used a toothpick to apply it to the stonework in much the same manner as I would use it to apply white glue. I got a dark gray shade (I can't recall the actual color name right now), but it dries almost black. To tone it down, I lightly dust it with Rembrandt Raw Umber chalk, #408-7. I wouldn't thin the Liquid Leading because I think it's made to be thick , but I imagine any of the usual thinners (water, Windex, etc.) would work if necessary.

Another way I have used Liquid Leading is to apply it as tar/pitch on roof valleys. If I remember correctly, I used a small flat brush with short bristles to apply it to this cabin roof:




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hon3_rr
Fireman

USA
7124 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2008 :  12:33:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks Mike for the feedback and picture to use as reference.

Peter, all the signs shown to date on my build were applied without the additional glue/phonebook paper backing, and do not look anywhere near as good as the few signs applied using the above suggested process. I really wish I had this process in my tool bag prior to applying the signs to the barn as I believe that it would have been really effective on that structure. It was the signs on the barn which really made me take a second look at this whole issue and come up with a method to improve the looks. This new process is one which I will always be using in all future applications of these type of signs unless someone comes up with a better backing or method.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.
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jaynjay
Fireman

USA
5654 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2008 :  3:22:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit jaynjay's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Kris,
The more that I follow this thread, the more I like what you've done with this kit. I might have to re-think my layout and find a spot for this little beauty. Great work, keep the fine pictures coming

John
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hon3_rr
Fireman

USA
7124 Posts

Posted - 09/06/2008 :  4:21:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Dormer and sub-roof are on the barn section. I found this section of the build more challenging than I had expected as my pre-read of the instructions understanding was not reality. For some reason, when the instructions said "flush" I was thinking over the edge of the barn. The sub-roof is "flush" with the top edges of the barn walls. Brett is clear in his instructions, I just didn't read it correctly. I would have expected some sort of strip wood ledge to glue the sub-roof to the way this sub roof is applied, but this is not the case, and my additional interior bracing enhanced the challenge of getting the sub-roof correctly applied. You have to have a couple of "got-ya's" in a build or it's no fun, right(??).

The dormer walls/back section(s) were not totally flush with the sub-roof, so I decided to play a little with the Liquid Leading which I plan to use during the gluing of the cookhouse walls to the barn wall.

As MikeC noted earlier, this stuff is really thick, about like 5 min epoxy after about 3-4 minutes. The leading was applied some from the inside to seal the dormer-sub roof seam, trying to get a feel for how it spreads. I played with a brush, tooth pick and coffee stir sticks, thus the major mess on the inside of the dormer. The product makes a nice 'seal' without running, and stays in place well, but it's very easy to spread as well as build up. I had almost no excess come out under the dormer seal when applied, it just filled the seam. The one area where I did press it through, I was easily able to remove with a tooth pick, and the leading is flush on both the sub-roof top as well as the face of the wood wall. In addition, the stuff acts like weak glue. All of the above said, I totally expect that the wood which will be applied to the roof will conceal the seam anyway, so this seam will probably not be viewable once the roof is completed.

Below are pictures showing the barn with dormer and barn sub-roof, and the Liquid Leading product. The second picture shows the largest dormer seam and how the leading filled it. You can see how it did go up the face of the wood slightly where I did push it through the seam. Again, it is totally flat on the face of the wall and sub-roof even though it does not appear that way in the picture.




-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.
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hon3_rr
Fireman

USA
7124 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2008 :  12:42:11 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
John, Thanks for the kind feedback, and per your earlier post at the start, next year is almost here... Maybe a Santa goodie??

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.
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hon3_rr
Fireman

USA
7124 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2008 :  3:49:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Question for you folks who have built this kit:
Did anyone put a few drops of water in the water tank located on top of the barn? IF so, what were the colors used in painting or used in tinting the product to represent water? Also, what product did you use for the water? Thanks in advance.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.
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Frederic Testard
Engineer

France
17652 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2008 :  4:40:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
David, I love the work you've done on Blue Sky, ans would be happy to see more photos of your modelling.
Kris, while I haven't built Blue Sky as yet, I once made some water for a water tank on my Sn3 pike. I used a circle of styrene which was painted grimy black, than coloured with shades of dark blue and green and finally covered with several coats of gloss varnish. It gave this simulated water a nice look.
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Sully
Fireman

USA
2667 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2008 :  7:18:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit Sully's Homepage  Reply with Quote
KP...just getting into your modeling...very nice...I plan on going back over the thread..looks like a lot of tips to learn about the Liquid Leading...tom
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Bbags
Administrator

USA
13287 Posts

Posted - 09/07/2008 :  9:43:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
KP,
I also use the liquid leading applied with a toothpick and I think I have the same bottle if the word in the upper left on the bottle says black.

I recently used it where wire was used to support a roof overhang and also the attach wires from a stack to the roof.
Pictures taken quickly with flash and no tripod so the colors are off and do I hate these close ups for they show all the little warts that need to be addressed.[:-banghead][:-banghead][:-censored]
But you can get the general idea that it works well to represent tar.






John Bagley
Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.
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hon3_rr
Fireman

USA
7124 Posts

Posted - 09/08/2008 :  11:41:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Question for you folks who have built this kit:
Did anyone put a few drops of water in the water tank located on top of the barn? IF so, what were the colors used in painting or used in tinting the product to represent water? Also, what product did you use for the water?

Fredric provided one possible idea, but it may need to be modified with this casting. I really don't want to open a new package of EnvroTex for just 3 or 4 drops. I'm thinking 5 min. epoxy or Future Floor wax. Any other ideas or options I'm missing?

Thanks in advance.

John, yes, I've got 'Black' Liquid Leading. Thanks for the additional input for the use of the product.

-- KP --
Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

Edited by - hon3_rr on 09/08/2008 11:43:36 PM
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