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Harsco
Fireman

USA
1202 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2009 :  5:44:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's been a little while since I threw out an update; since the last time there was another operating session that went pretty well (after overcoming a potentially troublesome paperwork snafu); the usual suspects were in attendance, which meant they managed to recover quite nicely from that as well as some....er, um....misplaced staging. Not having a camera, nothing remains for posterity except the lingering scent of Mrs Harsco's killer garlic dip.... a/k/a "The Breath of Death".

Having completed the Maclay Street area enough for the session, I began thinking about the other side of the layout, more specifically, the Capital Street switching area. Having been in the welding supply industry for over twenty years, I've seen my fair share of steel fabricators and suddenly wanted to transform Capital Iron and Steel from a casting manufacturer to a "bread and butter" type of steel fabricator - I beams, girders, box beams, and even vessels. My thinking is that 1) I can "move" the hot metal deliveries to another company, and 2) a steel fabricator not only receives materials in by rail, but is often a source of "high and wide" outbound shipments (as if this railroad isn't screwed up enough, right?). Actually, I stole the idea from Joe C's layout; his schedule includes a "H&W" every session and always seems to attract attention.

Armed with an array of leftovers, scrap and incomplete kits as well as judiciously stealing items from existing buildings, I laid out a typical steel fabrication shop and fit it into the existing area; here's a few shots of where I'm at:





The columns are CV box beams; the roof trusses stolen from a Walther's Rolling Mill kit. The bridge crane is still a work in progress, using bits and pieces of parts from different Walther's kits as well as scratchbuilding. The two tanks on the right will be used to represent liquid oxygen for steel cutting and liquid argon for backpurging vessels.

Here's the side view; the framework was hijacked from the Walther's Car Shops kit since it will be used in another configuration. A Walther's bridge crane, which runs perpendicular to the main shop crane, competes the set up:



There's still a lot to be done; using the Freytag article in this months MR, I'm still working on the main shop bridge crane. The roof needs to be installed and maybe siding just a little way down the side...this kind of set up can allow for a lot of detailing later...flatbed truck, piles of cut and primed beams, vessels completed and under construction, turning equipment, forklifts, gas cylinders, interior wall cranes, sandblasting equipment, etc.
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Dutchman
Administrator

USA
25310 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2009 :  5:46:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It looks like another great steel related industry, Rick.[:-thumbu]

Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3
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MarkF
Engineer

USA
10440 Posts

Posted - 04/03/2009 :  11:41:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit MarkF's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Wow Rick, that sure is impressive! You threw that together in no time. Can't wait to see it all come together.

Of course, now we have to go back and change the waybills! [:-banghead]

Mark

See my homepage at http://home.comcast.net/~prrndiv/
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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

USA
11050 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2009 :  08:20:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is going to be a very impressive industry!

Mike
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dnhman
Fireman

USA
1056 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2009 :  09:18:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rick,, Looking good ,, I Like it,
Joe

Cheers!, Joe
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shark_jj
Engine Wiper

Canada
363 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2009 :  10:50:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
very nice Rick, it will fit right in.

John Johnston
PRR Allegheny Division
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Steam Nut
Fireman

USA
1449 Posts

Posted - 04/04/2009 :  11:29:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Now I guess we could animate the crane's so we can load the loads before they are shipped out!
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Harsco
Fireman

USA
1202 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2009 :  7:29:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A couple of progress shots....first up is an updated Capital Iron and Steel, now painted and partially weathered. Still left to do is fabricating a floor and various products and equipment:




Meanwhile, inspired by John R's scratchbuilt structures made with illustration or mat board, I added another industry on the same spur serving the PRR Maclay Street Freight Terminal. Krause Brothers is a general warehousing and distribution company that specialized in appliances...your basic boxcar in and empty out type of customer. Tichy windows, a couple of left over Walther's garage style doors and water tank were used. Rustoleum Sandstone textured spray paint and dry transfers completed the building:







Since space is limited, the building was designed with close clearances:


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Dutchman
Administrator

USA
25310 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2009 :  7:57:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rick,

Very nice job on Krause Brothers. I really like it!

Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3
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hunter48820
Fireman

USA
6104 Posts

Posted - 04/28/2009 :  9:06:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Rick,
Both structures are really looking good. I also love the Krause Bros. building. I need alot of backdrop flats and I can see using some of this construction throughout the layout. You did a wonderful job on that one!!


Look out for #1, but don't step in #2!

Andy Keeney
Dewitt, MI
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MarkF
Engineer

USA
10440 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2009 :  12:32:54 AM  Show Profile  Visit MarkF's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I was at Rick's last night to help him get set up for the next op session and I have to tell you, those picture don't do the Krause Bros. building justice. It looks FANTASTIC! Rick, you nailed the color perfectly. And the weathering is outstanding! Nice job! You obviously got your hands on a camera to take some pics, but no pics of the new Maclay Street area???

Guys, he has been doing more scenicking and came across a method to do ashpalt roads that is quite frankly, the best I've ever seen! I won't go into detail here as Rick should do a 'show and tell' for everyone (hint, hint), but he's nailed it on that one too!

Rick, I already printed out the additional waybills for the next session. But I'm going to miss that garlic dip!

Mark

See my homepage at http://home.comcast.net/~prrndiv/
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Harsco
Fireman

USA
1202 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2009 :  05:24:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the comments, guys....I forgot to take pics of my asphalt road experiment and will attempt to get a few in the next day or so. Having used plastic and wood before, I have to say I'm VERY impressed with the matboard/illustration board/Strathmore stuff as a modeling medium. It cuts clean, takes paint well, and when properly braced, can be as stable as the other materials. I haven't tried scribing it to represent siding, although i know some people have done that. For modeling poured and pre-cast concrete, it can't be beat. The Sandstone paint is the same stuff I think Dutchman used for stucco if I'm not mistken...

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Dutchman
Administrator

USA
25310 Posts

Posted - 04/29/2009 :  07:55:03 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Harsco

The Sandstone paint is the same stuff I think Dutchman used for stucco if I'm not mistken...



Rick, the Sandstone paint that I've used has been by Decoart.

Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3
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Harsco
Fireman

USA
1202 Posts

Posted - 05/03/2009 :  09:24:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Another ops session was held last evening and we shook things up a bit by switching people around. This time I remembered to have the camera ready and took a few shots for posterity.

Yours truly occupied the dispatcher's desk for the first time; thanks to Mark F, we were fully equipped with the correct schematic and little magnetic markers needed to track movements. The system actually worked far better than either of us thought it would; I only needed to go out to the layout room maybe twice to actually eyeball or confirm the situation, which means the system worked pretty well....here's a shot of the panel and schematic:



Joe C "volunteered" to take on the role of Herr Street operator and despite never having run the place or even being aware of the procedures, did an incredible job keeping up with the deliveries and shipments:



Having freed himself from being the eternal dispatcher, Mark F gleefully served as a road crew and even managed to underhandedly snag the Capital Street Turn...here is is pondering how to deliver four cars to a three car industry, one of the challenging aspects of John R's "random proportional" car forwarding system:



Here's John R with a through freight exchanging blocks with Matt, the Division Street operator, who did a yeoman job with very little need for pre-breifing. Aside from classifying cars, the Division Street operator is also responsible for switching the North Harrisburg Industrial area:



Rich W got a chance to go on the road too; here he is with one of three dedicated train movements to Commonwealth Coke..this time with hoppers of coal, which will be exchanged for coke for Herr Street. The sign on the fascia to his right is a new addition and indicates a specific location for the dispatcher to route movements to or through; in this case the sign is for "LE", or the crossover at Lucknow East. Since my layout is relatively short but traffic intense, having these signs makes it easier for both the dispatcher and the road crew to know where to stop, where to crossover, and how much of the main line they are permitted to occupy. All the road crews last evening did an outstanding job of reporting themselves on location and when they off the main line:



John R at Lucknow, waiting for ore train P-9 to pass so that he can occupy both main lines to make a run around move before returning to Enola:





Steam shares my liking for long, fast trains: here his version of the fabled PRR TT-1 is seen passing by Herr Street just prior to plunging into the short tunnel to Maclay:



A scant five minutes later, a railfan caught TT-1 ripping through Lucknow on it's way to Rockville:


A few pre-session shots of some specific scenes; the first is Harrisburg Pipe and Casting's Shipping Department:



The compact engine servicing area at Maclay Street:



Light running repairs to both Harsco and other rolling stock are handled at the small maintenance facility at Maclay:



And finally, here's an overall shot of the eastern portion of Maclay Street:



Aside from the usual array of nagging problems, the session went very well with everyone adapting to their new roles with little problem. One result of the evening was a shift in the minimum number of operators needed to make the session proceed at a respectable but not tiring rate; we had seven and could have really used at least one more operators to keep things flowing. Herr Street Yard remains the real focus of the oeprational tempo; a great deal of the scheduled movements either end there, drop off there, or originate there, making it the hub for the "Seven Miles of Sheer Hell" route.

Edited by - Harsco on 05/03/2009 09:31:00 AM
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dnhman
Fireman

USA
1056 Posts

Posted - 05/03/2009 :  10:39:51 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Rick, Thanks Again, Had a great time on Herr st. I love those jbos that keep you busy...
Joe
Folks, Rick is humble here the layout is great to run and look at. Rick has done a great job with his industrial scenery with many scrathbuilt and kitbashed buildings that really capture the look and fell of the steel industries. An added benefit from working this job was that I now have better knowledge of the steel industry practices and plant movements. Even if it was a "crash" course!
Thanks Rick
JOe

Cheers!, Joe
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