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T O P I C    R E V I E W
Bernd Posted - 01/12/2020 : 2:19:16 PM
This thread will be about the layout Iím going to build or should I say try to build? As I build the different sections I need a place to keep all projects together so I can remember what Iíve done and post the next update to. I hope to tie all the loose posts Iíve done so far into this one thread.

Unfortunately I couldn't get everything in the subject line. Here's what I wanted to post.

New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

Bernd
15   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
Bernd Posted - 08/27/2020 : 4:39:43 PM
quote:
Thanks for the detailed explanation on how you drilled the acrylic. You make it look easy.

George


Thanks George. It is easy, I just use different tools than everybody is used to using.

CarlB said:

quote:
I'll be watching "the machinist" closely.


Careful you don't get a chip in your eye.

quote:
Bernd.

Where is the "Mr Safety Poster" in that spinning drill bit / finger photo? Glad to see your 'auxiliary' work area is neater than mine. Keep up the great work! It's going to be terrific.

Jim


The Safety Poster is behind the machine where you can't see it. Will detail this project to the "bitter" end. [:-smile_green]

quote:
Bernd you may do things to "over kill" but they will last a lifetime.


Frank


Thanks Frank. problem is I need several "lifetimes" to get all my projects done.

Ok, final picture of the mold box and wall portion. I haven't decided if I wan to screw the wall down or use silicone sealant. The sealant doesn't stick to the acrylic to good.



I have a second mold box to make. I'll wind up with two of these walls. Then I have several more to make for the other wall sections I want to try and make plaster walls from. In total that'll be 7 more mold boxes. Once the mold boxes are all done I'll order the silicone rubber to pour the molds.

Bernd
Frank Palmer Posted - 08/26/2020 : 09:23:40 AM

Bernd you may do things to "over kill" but they will last a lifetime. [:-thumbu]
BurleyJim Posted - 08/25/2020 : 7:12:40 PM
Bernd.

Where is the "Mr Safety Poster" in that spinning drill bit / finger photo? Glad to see your 'auxiliary' work area is neater than mine. Keep up the great work! It's going to be terrific.

Jim
Carl B Posted - 08/25/2020 : 5:58:59 PM
I'll be watching "the machinist" closely.
George D Posted - 08/25/2020 : 3:26:14 PM
Thanks for the detailed explanation on how you drilled the acrylic. You make it look easy.

George
Bernd Posted - 08/25/2020 : 2:40:08 PM
Ok, it rained very early this morning and the rest of the day is supposed to have some rain so I called a "rain day" to do some modeling. I couldn't decide which project to work on. I decided to work on the master rock mold.

When I left off on the last page I showed how I was going to drill the holes in the Acrylic so they match. What I'm going to show is called match drilling, at least that's what they called it back at work.

First I found what the thickness of the base plate is.



Taking half of that figure, .100", I scribed a short line on where to drill a #50 (.070" dia.) hole in the side panel.



Set up my mini-mill with a #50 drill and drilled a hole .100" from the bottom edge.



Back at the Bridgeport I eye-balled the side plate in from the end and from the back stop. Made sure everything was flush.



Drilled down the full length of the flutes on the drill.



Next I used a center in the drill chuck to hold the tap handle square to the hole and proceeded to tap the hole with hand power.



Open up the #50 hole to a clearance hole for the #2-56 screw and tightened down the side panel.



This allowed me to hold the piece in place with one screw while drilling the second hole.



Holding the side piece against the back stop helps keep everything in alignment.



And the end result. Only three more sides to do.



I know some are thinking this is more work than it's worth, but hey, it's a master mold right?

Bernd
Bill Gill Posted - 08/10/2020 : 4:38:56 PM
Ah, gotcha. I see what you're aiming for.
Bernd Posted - 08/10/2020 : 3:07:27 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Bill Gill

Bernd, just a thought...instead of cutting apart the wall into individual stones after casting it,
would it work as well to use a variety of tools (Dremel, hobby knife, small gouge and chisel to slightly change
the faces of stones so they don't look like they did originally? Then you'll have walls that don't look like any
others, but still a solid one piece casting overall?



I didn't state it right as to what I want to accomplish. Here's a picture of the South River Model Works block roundhouse.



Notice the two bottom rows of blocks. They are quite even in size all along the length of the wall. They also seems to stand a bit proud of the stones above. I also want to attain a more balanced look. If they had ever sold individual stone molds I would have bought those and not have to cut the stones from a solid wall casting. It'll be kind of like I did the walls on the rock-crusher, individual blocks.

I refer you to the pictures on the first page of the different vinyl rock wall products. I will be making plaster castings of these and cut out the individual stones to assemble into a master mold. A lot of work? Yup, but I'm hoping I'll be able to attain a look I like.
Bill Gill Posted - 08/07/2020 : 3:45:45 PM
Bernd, just a thought...instead of cutting apart the wall into individual stones after casting it,
would it work as well to use a variety of tools (Dremel, hobby knife, small gouge and chisel to slightly change
the faces of stones so they don't look like they did originally? Then you'll have walls that don't look like any
others, but still a solid one piece casting overall?
Bernd Posted - 08/07/2020 : 2:29:35 PM
quote:
Originally posted by desertdrover

Nice progress Bernd! I like your choice for the stone wall blocks of the roundhouse. Looks as though you are putting a lot of work into this project.



Thanks Louis. I've a few more samples of stone walls that I'm going to use. These are the first two molds. I have six, probably 7 more molds to make. See the pictures of the items near the top of the first page.

I want to make all the molds first before I order a large amount of casting rubber and pour the molds all at once.

Bernd
Bernd Posted - 08/07/2020 : 2:25:16 PM
quote:
Originally posted by deemery

Bernd, I find it really useful to buy a stone tile (not ceramic, the stone is honed flat) and permanently sprayglue sandpaper to that stone. I think I have 2 different grits done that way. It's a necessity for working with castings to get a smooth and even surface.

Interesting to see your drilling setup!

dave



Dave,


That's a great idea on gluing down the sandpaper. Since I'll be doing some sanding on the plaster walls I'll have to look into that idea. Thanks.

The drilling set up comes from years spent in the machine industry. This way the holes will match when you assemble the parts. I'll do a more in-depth post when I get around to doing that.

Bernd
Bernd Posted - 08/07/2020 : 2:21:46 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Frank Palmer


So let me get this straight. You're making a mold of the walls and then you're going to cut the blocks apart and reconstruct new walls.




Yes, you are correct. This way I get to control the size and position of where I want the blocks to be placed. Those molded walls is the closest I could find to the type of blocks I wanted. Also once finished with the walls I'm hoping that the roundhouse will have a different look from the kits out there.

Bernd
Bernd Posted - 08/07/2020 : 2:17:48 PM
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Youíre not going to get perfection if you donít strive for it. Itís going to be a beauty of a roundhouse.

Mike



I'm trying to control myself into taking time to do a project. One of my problems has always been to start a project and then sit there and think of all the wonderful things I'm going to do to get to the end of finishing the project as my minds eye see's it as finished. I've got several collecting dust that started out that way. After watching you guys here building such beautiful structures and other model items and the time you took to get them where you wanted them to end up I figured I need to try that. So, so far so good.

Bernd
desertdrover Posted - 08/07/2020 : 1:05:30 PM
Nice progress Bernd! I like your choice for the stone wall blocks of the roundhouse. Looks as though you are putting a lot of work into this project.
deemery Posted - 08/07/2020 : 10:52:48 AM
Bernd, I find it really useful to buy a stone tile (not ceramic, the stone is honed flat) and permanently sprayglue sandpaper to that stone. I think I have 2 different grits done that way. It's a necessity for working with castings to get a smooth and even surface.

Interesting to see your drilling setup!

dave

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