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 Tellynott corner module

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T O P I C    R E V I E W
mark_dalrymple Posted - 02/25/2011 : 4:22:03 PM
Hi all.

I will, in weeks to come, carry on with this module, but for now, just wanted to let everyone know I was safe. At present, we still have no internet, so can only reply every few days when out and about.

Just a quick update to let everyone know that myself and all that i know (so far) are all OK after Christchurch's 6.3 earthquake. Although much small than our september 7.1, this earthquake (on a newly discovered fault line I believe) was much closer to the city and far shallower. it caused substantial damage in the central city ( including the total destruction of two multi story buildings) and also many of the burbs. The death toll last I heard was 113, but this is expected to rise to over 200. Many of the older buildings were OK or saveable after our sept earthquake, but are now piles of rubble.

On a positive note, Tellynott lives on, with some repairable damage. I will post pics of the Tellynott damage when we have internet back on at home, and an update.

Its a good day to be alive.

Cheers, Mark.
15   L A T E S T    R E P L I E S    (Newest First)
Frank Palmer Posted - 09/15/2020 : 09:18:31 AM

I'm enjoying the progress.
Guff Posted - 09/14/2020 : 7:47:47 PM
Mark,
Wonderful work! Mike is correct...the build keeps getting better and better.
George D Posted - 09/14/2020 : 3:45:07 PM
Good looking water tank, Mark.

George
mark_dalrymple Posted - 09/14/2020 : 3:21:32 PM
Hi guys.

Thanks so much Michael, Carl and Frank!

I got a bit more done on the water tank and support tower. So after grovelling around in the garage looking for a suitable former for my tank I settled on a spare broom handle. I cut a piece to length in my mitre saw. I cut lengths of 6"x1" a little longer than the tank former and gave them a stain bath. I marked vertical center lines and a center line down the tank former top and glued the pieces on the end. I went half way, trimmed them off, and then used the off-cuts for the other half. When the glue was dry I used a single edged razor blade to trim them flush with the edge of the former.

Photo 1 - shows the first end glued onto the former.


Once I had done both ends I glued the strips of 6"x2" around the circumference of the former. The last piece was ripped to fit.

Photo 2 - shows the 6"x2" glued around the outside of the former.


I then carried on with the stand. I put in horizontal bracing to line up the legs, inside and outside the posts on the front and one side. I then added diagonal bracing.

Photo 3 - shows the bracing attached and the tank sitting in position.


I cut 4"x4" posts and cut rebates in the ends of the ones for the long wall, down to 4"x2"s to fit over the outside joist. The posts were glued into position. I then cut decking from 12"x2" and glued this on, checking the decking around the posts where necessary.

Photo 4 - show the posts in position.


I cut a piece of high tack painters tape to slightly longer than the circumference of the tank and taped it to my cutting board. I marked and cut strips to represent tank bands. I painted the tape a rust colour, marked five positions on the tank at four equal spacing's around the circumference, carefully peeled the strips off (when dry) and attached them around the tank. I put the joins at the bottom. For the ends of the tank I used 3 pieces of stripwood.

I also put the 4"x2" railings around the tank platform. I then cut a circle of thin styrene the same diameter as the tank, removed the center, and drew a square around the circle about 3mm bigger than the circle. I then cut these into four equal arcs with a flat bottom and sandwiched two pairs together with a piece of square strip in the middle to create tank cradles. These I painted cool grey and glued to the bottom of the tank.




More soon, cheers, Mark.
Frank Palmer Posted - 09/14/2020 : 09:37:06 AM


Mark, that set of buildings has a ton of character. Well done mate.
Carl B Posted - 09/14/2020 : 09:33:25 AM
Extremely well done Mark. [:-thumbu]
Michael Hohn Posted - 09/14/2020 : 09:29:48 AM
Just keeps getting better, Mark. The cupola tops it off nicely.

It will be interesting watching you build a kit.

Mike
mark_dalrymple Posted - 09/14/2020 : 03:05:34 AM
Next was to assemble the copula. There was a lot of work in this little addition. I have a couple of touch ups to do. I put the tape on the beveled roof, mitering the corners, cut a square slightly smaller than the top notch, and then peeled back the edges. After the top notch was glued in position I used a toothpick to push the tape into the bottom edges of the top notch as a flashing.




As an aside I bought my first ebay purchase since COVID19 hit. My wife has been asking me what I want for my birthday. I've been looking at Sheepscot's Arcadia granite on ebay and talking myself out of it (the price, such a big kit it might overpower my mountain scenery, I already have the lime works to build, etc). Today a saw FSM's rock bunker for a good price and decent international shipping so I thought 'why not'. This kit has always been one of my favourites, and one of the few FSM kits I think I could find room for now. It will also be able to be tucked into the mountain side as a bit of a surprise without dominating the scene.

Onto the cannery progress.

I went with grey tar paper for the second story roof, and will do black for the first story. I had to add some 8"x8" in white to the bottom of the cupola to get things to sit right. My flashings hid most of this, but it looks intentional anyway. I chiseled the side wall where the cupola fits up against to get a nice fit and glued it into place. I had put the roofing material on first, trimmed it around where the cupola sits, and peeled the edges up. When the glue was set I pushed it into the edges with a toothpick. Three coals of slate grey were applied followed by a dry-brushing with unbleached titanium. Weathering with chalks is still to be done. I made a stack from some styrene pipe. I wrapped a piece of thin strip styrene around it to simulate a join. I cut a small slither of larger diameter pipe, glued this to some thin styrene, trimmed the excess away and sanded the edges to make a cap. I painted these in grey followed by unbleached titanium using the dry sock method. I cut a circle of high tack painters tape about 4mm larger in diameter than the stack, cut a smaller circle in the center, and cut a bunch of nicks heading for the center of the circle. I cut one all the way through and using tweezers and a toothpick was able to maneuver this around the stack to form a flashing with the flaps folded up the side. I then cut a thin strip of painters tape and wrapped this around to hide the nicks. This was then painted grey. I have also started work on the elevated water tank and support tower (photo 4) which will sit against the structure. I have heightened the stand slightly from my original plans so that the tower decking will hide the seem of the first and second story meeting. It will also give me slightly more head room for pedestrian traffic below. There is a change in level here and a set of stairs between them - hence the two shorter legs.









More soon, cheers, Mark.
mark_dalrymple Posted - 09/14/2020 : 02:53:05 AM
Hi guys.

I have 20 minutes so I'll see if I can get things up to date.

Photo 1 - shows the hole I carefully cut into the side of the structure. This is the opening for the doors from the open elevated walkway into the cannery.


Photo 2 - shows the new scratch-built doors framed and in positions. Again I used nut-bolt-washer castings painted brass as door handles. These doors will connect the open walk-over to the main structure.


Photo 3 - shows the base of the cupola assembled and a small plastic roof piece. You can see I filed a bevel on to the roof. There is a small gable topnotch to go in the center.


Photo 4 - shows the walls of the topnotch. I had to very carefully cut out timber for the louvers. None of my chisel blades were small enough so I used a number 11 blade. The side walls are 8mm high.


Photo 5 - shows the double doors attached and hanging in their tracks. I drilled holes in the ends of the pelmets and added nut-bolt-washer castings to attach them to the wall. You can also see the finger hole in the railings (I managed to trim the 4x2's back to half on a post, so repair shouldn't be too bad.


More soon, cheers, Mark.
mark_dalrymple Posted - 09/13/2020 : 4:53:01 PM
I must get outside to do some chores, but will post an update tonight.

More soon, cheers, Mark.
mark_dalrymple Posted - 09/13/2020 : 4:48:40 PM
quote:
Fantastic!


Thanks, Frank!

Cheers, Mark.
mark_dalrymple Posted - 09/13/2020 : 4:47:31 PM
quote:
A building worthy of a lot of study. I keep looking back at the pictures to enjoy the complexity of the building, Wonderful job!!


Thanks so much, David.

I think the open walkway will add a lot. It should also frame nice views of the longitudinal view to the corner module.

Cheers, Mark.
mark_dalrymple Posted - 09/13/2020 : 4:44:03 PM
quote:
Excellent work, Mark. I find your increasingly complex cannery very intriguing.


Thanks, Michael.

There is still a ways to go, but I feel the end is in sight! I think I will definitely tackle a simpler project next - maybe one of the DPM kit-bashes.

Cheers, Mark.
mark_dalrymple Posted - 09/13/2020 : 4:41:23 PM
quote:
Fantastic plan and execution! Bravo Mark!


Thanks, Carl!

Its been a fun ride. Easily the longest I have spent on a single model. I am pleased with my perseverance though.

Cheers, Mark.
mark_dalrymple Posted - 09/13/2020 : 4:39:24 PM
quote:
Looking good Mark. Lots of interesting details at catching angles.


Thanks, Bob.

Yes - all those angles and elevation changes take a lot of working out, but I think it is worth it.

Cheers, Mark.

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