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THE GALLERY: May 2005 - Rolling Stock

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Topic URL: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=8840
Printed on: 02/22/2019

Topic:


Topic author: Dutchman
Subject: THE GALLERY: May 2005 - Rolling Stock
Posted on: 05/01/2005 5:53:44 PM
Message:

Welcome to the May 2005 Photo Gallery!

Mike C. recently pointed out to me that we have not had a Gallery Topic devoted to rolling stock. Now I know that we have a number of members whose passion is building/detailing/weathering rolling stock, thus we need to address this oversight.

So, fellow Forum Members, lets share our favorite pictures of rolling stock, both model and prototype. If it is a picture of a model, remember to mention the manufacturer and any modifications that you have made to the model. Have you been playing around with weathering rolling stock? This is the opportunity to share your efforts in this month’s Gallery. Scratchbuilders and kitbashers, jump right in. (Those members participating in the Exchange Program might want to post a few pictures here as well.) Finally, if taking prototype photos is your passion, feel free to add them to the Gallery.

As always, please adhere to the following posting requirements: photo files should be no more than 80kb @ 72ppi in size - even if downloading from a remote server or website - and can be no more than 7 inches in width (to prevent viewers from having to scroll back and forth to see the entire photo or read text on the same page).

Photo submissions not meeting the above requirements will be resized by the Moderator.

With no further ado, let the posting begin!

Replies:


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/01/2005 9:26:00 PM
Message:

I'll get the ball rolling this month with a pic of my Hot Metal Bottle Car by TRIX ( Marklin )



I bought 2 of these 8 truck monsters ( about a foot long ) from the good guys at Peach Creek Hobbys in Laurel, Maryland . John and his folks handle a lot of the steel mill equipment that I need .

Terry


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/01/2005 9:26:00 PM
Message:

I'll get the ball rolling this month with a pic of my Hot Metal Bottle Car by TRIX ( Marklin )



I bought 2 of these 8 truck monsters ( about a foot long ) from the good guys at Peach Creek Hobbys in Laurel, Maryland . John and his folks handle a lot of the steel mill equipment that I need .

Terry


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/01/2005 9:41:34 PM
Message:

Terry,
Thanks for starting us out with a really interesting model!

Here is a night shot of an old Erie boxcar (Athearn model).


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/01/2005 9:41:34 PM
Message:

Terry,
Thanks for starting us out with a really interesting model!

Here is a night shot of an old Erie boxcar (Athearn model).


Reply author: Drew
Replied on: 05/02/2005 08:45:55 AM
Message:

Terry,
Now THAT is a piece of rolling stock![:-bigeyes2]
Bruce,
Beautiful night shot there, my friend! [:-thumbu]

Well, I guess I timed this right…right when I’ve just about finished this project, the Gallery theme this month is rolling stock!
This is a On30 flatcar that I’ve almost finished…it started out as an HO caboose from an old Life Like trainset that I got about 13 years ago…


Reply author: Drew
Replied on: 05/02/2005 08:45:55 AM
Message:

Terry,
Now THAT is a piece of rolling stock![:-bigeyes2]
Bruce,
Beautiful night shot there, my friend! [:-thumbu]

Well, I guess I timed this right…right when I’ve just about finished this project, the Gallery theme this month is rolling stock!
This is a On30 flatcar that I’ve almost finished…it started out as an HO caboose from an old Life Like trainset that I got about 13 years ago…


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/02/2005 08:58:55 AM
Message:

Terry
That is one awesome piece of rolling stock.

Bruce
Nice shot! (Now where have I seen that car before?)

Drew
Nice flat car!

I posted this before but I think it deserves posting again since it is so unusual. Here is the first prototype shot. It is a Raritan River boxcar in Quakertown, PA.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/02/2005 08:58:55 AM
Message:

Terry
That is one awesome piece of rolling stock.

Bruce
Nice shot! (Now where have I seen that car before?)

Drew
Nice flat car!

I posted this before but I think it deserves posting again since it is so unusual. Here is the first prototype shot. It is a Raritan River boxcar in Quakertown, PA.


Reply author: lab-dad
Replied on: 05/02/2005 09:15:41 AM
Message:

Finally one of these I can contribute to!



On30 16'. The tank was a gift from Marc Reusser (GL I tink), trucks are Bachmann freight. GL stirrups, NBW's & Brake wheel/ratchet, Kadee #5's.

The flat is scratch built using plans I developed. Frame mebers are walnut, deck is coffee sticks, stanchions for the hand rail are from an HO loco, tank straps are scratch, A&I and weathering powders.

-Mj


Reply author: lab-dad
Replied on: 05/02/2005 09:15:41 AM
Message:

Finally one of these I can contribute to!



On30 16'. The tank was a gift from Marc Reusser (GL I tink), trucks are Bachmann freight. GL stirrups, NBW's & Brake wheel/ratchet, Kadee #5's.

The flat is scratch built using plans I developed. Frame mebers are walnut, deck is coffee sticks, stanchions for the hand rail are from an HO loco, tank straps are scratch, A&I and weathering powders.

-Mj


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/02/2005 09:38:24 AM
Message:

Excellent photos and examples of rolling stock, guys![:-thumbu][:-thumbu]


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/02/2005 09:38:24 AM
Message:

Excellent photos and examples of rolling stock, guys![:-thumbu][:-thumbu]


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 05/02/2005 1:09:28 PM
Message:

This looks to be an interesting month from the photos so far. Here are a couple of passenger car pics.


This is a center door combine (aka Jim Crow car) kitbashed many years ago from a Labelle kit. The trucks are from Central Valley, when you could still buy them at the LHS.


And here we have private car #100, also kitbashed from a LaBelle Business Car kit. While the combine has seats, this one is detailed very lavishly inside based on Robert Aaberg's RMC articles form the 70's.

Enjoy,


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 05/02/2005 1:09:28 PM
Message:

This looks to be an interesting month from the photos so far. Here are a couple of passenger car pics.


This is a center door combine (aka Jim Crow car) kitbashed many years ago from a Labelle kit. The trucks are from Central Valley, when you could still buy them at the LHS.


And here we have private car #100, also kitbashed from a LaBelle Business Car kit. While the combine has seats, this one is detailed very lavishly inside based on Robert Aaberg's RMC articles form the 70's.

Enjoy,


Reply author: George D
Replied on: 05/02/2005 2:32:55 PM
Message:

Good pictures to start the month everyone.

Steve, those Labelle cars are beautiful. Any interior shots of the private car?

George


Reply author: George D
Replied on: 05/02/2005 2:32:55 PM
Message:

Good pictures to start the month everyone.

Steve, those Labelle cars are beautiful. Any interior shots of the private car?

George


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/02/2005 2:33:11 PM
Message:

Here is a photo of a Bowser X-31a double door auto boxcar I painted and lettered for the Wyoming Valley RR. The only modifications I made to it was to add Kadee #5s, P2K wheels and brake rigging from brass wire and spare Tichy brake parts.


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/02/2005 2:33:11 PM
Message:

Here is a photo of a Bowser X-31a double door auto boxcar I painted and lettered for the Wyoming Valley RR. The only modifications I made to it was to add Kadee #5s, P2K wheels and brake rigging from brass wire and spare Tichy brake parts.


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 05/02/2005 2:58:45 PM
Message:

Thanks George, ask and ye shall receive. Here's the interior of the business car.


Aaberg suggested using wood grained self stick shelf paper for the walls. It's OK, but I think actually pretty crude by today's standards. The furniture is mostly SS Ltd, which wass all that was avalable back then, as well as some scratch built pieces. The curtains are gros grain ribbon, which I still use for curtains in structures. The chef in the galley is by Preiser.


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 05/02/2005 2:58:45 PM
Message:

Thanks George, ask and ye shall receive. Here's the interior of the business car.


Aaberg suggested using wood grained self stick shelf paper for the walls. It's OK, but I think actually pretty crude by today's standards. The furniture is mostly SS Ltd, which wass all that was avalable back then, as well as some scratch built pieces. The curtains are gros grain ribbon, which I still use for curtains in structures. The chef in the galley is by Preiser.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/02/2005 3:25:39 PM
Message:

Wow, we have an active day in this thread already!

Drew, what do you have left to do on the flatcar?

Tom, what is the story behind that photo. That boxcar has seen better days!

Marty, that is a neat model. Nice example of scratchbuilding!

Steve, those models are nice both inside and out. I haven't even begun collecting any passenger car kits. I need something of reasonable length (80 footers will not look good on my tight curves).

Eric, did you have decals made up for that car, or did you print your own on an Alps printer?


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/02/2005 3:25:39 PM
Message:

Wow, we have an active day in this thread already!

Drew, what do you have left to do on the flatcar?

Tom, what is the story behind that photo. That boxcar has seen better days!

Marty, that is a neat model. Nice example of scratchbuilding!

Steve, those models are nice both inside and out. I haven't even begun collecting any passenger car kits. I need something of reasonable length (80 footers will not look good on my tight curves).

Eric, did you have decals made up for that car, or did you print your own on an Alps printer?


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 05/02/2005 4:15:47 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Wow, we have an active day in this thread

I haven't even begun collecting any passenger car kits. I need something of reasonable length (80 footers will not look good on my tight curves).


I'm with you, Bruce. I always wanted to model long passenger trains, but never had the spaace.[:-banghead] So the best I can muster is that combine at the tail end of a freight train. But it works for me

Speaking of passengers, from deep in the heart of the Colorado Mountains comes this unique . . . well, you know what it is.


Yet another piece of rail history preserved at Knott's Berry Farm.


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 05/02/2005 4:15:47 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Wow, we have an active day in this thread

I haven't even begun collecting any passenger car kits. I need something of reasonable length (80 footers will not look good on my tight curves).


I'm with you, Bruce. I always wanted to model long passenger trains, but never had the spaace.[:-banghead] So the best I can muster is that combine at the tail end of a freight train. But it works for me

Speaking of passengers, from deep in the heart of the Colorado Mountains comes this unique . . . well, you know what it is.


Yet another piece of rail history preserved at Knott's Berry Farm.


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/02/2005 4:44:21 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Eric, did you have decals made up for that car, or did you print your own on an Alps printer?



Bruce,

The herald I had custom made by Rail Graphics. The road name I ordered from Champions private name series. The dimensional data is from left over sets that I had lying around.


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/02/2005 4:44:21 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Eric, did you have decals made up for that car, or did you print your own on an Alps printer?



Bruce,

The herald I had custom made by Rail Graphics. The road name I ordered from Champions private name series. The dimensional data is from left over sets that I had lying around.


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/02/2005 5:02:32 PM
Message:

Looks great, Eric! I'll add my version of the WYoming Valley:



Chuck


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/02/2005 5:02:32 PM
Message:

Looks great, Eric! I'll add my version of the WYoming Valley:



Chuck


Reply author: George D
Replied on: 05/02/2005 5:11:10 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by leeflan

Aaberg suggested using wood grained self stick shelf paper for the walls. It's OK, but I think actually pretty crude by today's standards. The furniture is mostly SS Ltd, which wass all that was avalable back then, as well as some scratch built pieces. The curtains are gros grain ribbon, which I still use for curtains in structures. The chef in the galley is by Preiser.



Steve, even by today's standards, it looks pretty good to me.[:-thumbu]

George


Reply author: George D
Replied on: 05/02/2005 5:11:10 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by leeflan

Aaberg suggested using wood grained self stick shelf paper for the walls. It's OK, but I think actually pretty crude by today's standards. The furniture is mostly SS Ltd, which wass all that was avalable back then, as well as some scratch built pieces. The curtains are gros grain ribbon, which I still use for curtains in structures. The chef in the galley is by Preiser.



Steve, even by today's standards, it looks pretty good to me.[:-thumbu]

George


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/02/2005 5:37:55 PM
Message:

Boy, if this first page is any indication, I think this month's Gallery is going to be red-hot! Great looking stuff, guys![:-thumbu][:-thumbu]


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/02/2005 5:37:55 PM
Message:

Boy, if this first page is any indication, I think this month's Gallery is going to be red-hot! Great looking stuff, guys![:-thumbu][:-thumbu]


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/02/2005 6:45:24 PM
Message:


This is a Tichy wheel flat. My only modification was to add complete brake piping.

-Dave


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/02/2005 6:45:24 PM
Message:


This is a Tichy wheel flat. My only modification was to add complete brake piping.

-Dave


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/02/2005 7:28:05 PM
Message:

Dave,
Nice job on the Tichy kit! Did it come with the load?

Eric & Chuck,
Now what is the chances of two WV modelers coming together on the same Forum (unless it was a special interest site)?

Chuck, where did you get your WV decals?


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/02/2005 7:28:05 PM
Message:

Dave,
Nice job on the Tichy kit! Did it come with the load?

Eric & Chuck,
Now what is the chances of two WV modelers coming together on the same Forum (unless it was a special interest site)?

Chuck, where did you get your WV decals?


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/02/2005 8:29:07 PM
Message:

Funny you should ask, Bruce. The same place as Eric. Rail Graphics. I designed the logo using EasyCAD years ago. The rest is Rail Graphics standard "Railroad Roman" printed with the logo.

It really is funny to have two freelanced model railroads with the same name on this forum.

Chuck


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/02/2005 8:29:07 PM
Message:

Funny you should ask, Bruce. The same place as Eric. Rail Graphics. I designed the logo using EasyCAD years ago. The rest is Rail Graphics standard "Railroad Roman" printed with the logo.

It really is funny to have two freelanced model railroads with the same name on this forum.

Chuck


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/02/2005 9:08:27 PM
Message:

Wow, the topic is not even two days old and I am losing track already.

Great pictures and great rolling stock everyone!


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/02/2005 9:08:27 PM
Message:

Wow, the topic is not even two days old and I am losing track already.

Great pictures and great rolling stock everyone!


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/02/2005 9:21:22 PM
Message:

I posted these many months (years??) ago, so some of you have already seen them. Anyhoo...

This is a scratchbuilt HOn3 "tool caboose" that I built about 5 years ago. It was based on a Julian Cavalier article and drawings that appeared in the Gazette in the early 90's.






Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/02/2005 9:21:22 PM
Message:

I posted these many months (years??) ago, so some of you have already seen them. Anyhoo...

This is a scratchbuilt HOn3 "tool caboose" that I built about 5 years ago. It was based on a Julian Cavalier article and drawings that appeared in the Gazette in the early 90's.






Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/02/2005 9:48:56 PM
Message:

A string of cabooses ( cabeese ? ) on our Windsor Modular Club layout ....not sure who built them but it wasn't me .




...the trees , well .....this is about rolling stock isn't it ? No , they weren't mine either .

Terry


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/02/2005 9:48:56 PM
Message:

A string of cabooses ( cabeese ? ) on our Windsor Modular Club layout ....not sure who built them but it wasn't me .




...the trees , well .....this is about rolling stock isn't it ? No , they weren't mine either .

Terry


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/02/2005 10:08:10 PM
Message:

Terry & Mike, since you have posted some great caboose pics, I thought that I would add this one that I have shown some pics of before.

It started life as an Athearn Blue Box Work Caboose Kit lettered for the ATSF. I stripped it, repainted and lettered it for the Susquehanna. I also added wire grabs, steps, a stripwood deck and side rails, and a few other detail parts.







Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/02/2005 10:08:10 PM
Message:

Terry & Mike, since you have posted some great caboose pics, I thought that I would add this one that I have shown some pics of before.

It started life as an Athearn Blue Box Work Caboose Kit lettered for the ATSF. I stripped it, repainted and lettered it for the Susquehanna. I also added wire grabs, steps, a stripwood deck and side rails, and a few other detail parts.







Reply author: dash10
Replied on: 05/02/2005 10:12:47 PM
Message:

Nice pictures guys.

Here is a powered speeder pulling a weedsprayer cart. The Bolder Valley Model's speeder was powered with a Spectrum GE44 T truck rather than a brill trolley which leaves the cab open so you can see through it. The weed sparayer is one of the cart frames and everything on it is scratchbuilt by me. Fred


Reply author: dash10
Replied on: 05/02/2005 10:12:47 PM
Message:

Nice pictures guys.

Here is a powered speeder pulling a weedsprayer cart. The Bolder Valley Model's speeder was powered with a Spectrum GE44 T truck rather than a brill trolley which leaves the cab open so you can see through it. The weed sparayer is one of the cart frames and everything on it is scratchbuilt by me. Fred


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/02/2005 10:17:52 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Dave,
Nice job on the Tichy kit! Did it come with the load?


You can get the flat car, you can get the load, or you can get the carwith the load. See Walthers 2005 p.242.
-Dave


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/02/2005 10:17:52 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Dave,
Nice job on the Tichy kit! Did it come with the load?


You can get the flat car, you can get the load, or you can get the carwith the load. See Walthers 2005 p.242.
-Dave


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/02/2005 10:23:09 PM
Message:

Geez , Bruce ...I really REALLY like the look of a transfer caboose , and I've never had one . I guess it's time !

Terry


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/02/2005 10:23:09 PM
Message:

Geez , Bruce ...I really REALLY like the look of a transfer caboose , and I've never had one . I guess it's time !

Terry


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/03/2005 01:00:56 AM
Message:

The INTERCHANGE has been a great opportunity to see another's railcar up-close and personal. It has also been a great opportunity to run it with cars it will probably never see again. Since TomPM is the owner of this LNE boxcar, I'm gonna let him tell you about it. It is the first car on my layout that wears weathering and my other cars are sure envious. It looks great from any angle.







Allen
Running Eastern Rolling Stock in the West!


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/03/2005 01:00:56 AM
Message:

The INTERCHANGE has been a great opportunity to see another's railcar up-close and personal. It has also been a great opportunity to run it with cars it will probably never see again. Since TomPM is the owner of this LNE boxcar, I'm gonna let him tell you about it. It is the first car on my layout that wears weathering and my other cars are sure envious. It looks great from any angle.







Allen
Running Eastern Rolling Stock in the West!


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/03/2005 07:54:06 AM
Message:

Mike
Awesome cars!

Terry
Nice shot!

Bruce
The caboose looks great! I remember following along when you did it.

Fred
Nice scene and cars!

Allen
Nice photos!
As far as the car goes it was one of my first custom paint and lettering jobs. The car started out as a undecorated Athearn 40’ boxcar. I painted it with Folk Art Barnyard Red and decaled it from a Walthers decal set. Prior to sending it into the Interchange I upgraded it by painting the undercarriage and changing the wheels from Proto 33” metal wheels to 36” metal. I changed the wheels because it needed the extra height to meet the Kadee coupler gauge. With the 33” wheels I had to use Kadee washers on the trucks but the car sat high and did not look right. I am slowly changing wheels on all my Athearn 40’ boxcars to fix this problem. The car was originally weathered by drybrushing and a wash. Before it left the RK&M I did some additional weathering with the airbrush.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/03/2005 07:54:06 AM
Message:

Mike
Awesome cars!

Terry
Nice shot!

Bruce
The caboose looks great! I remember following along when you did it.

Fred
Nice scene and cars!

Allen
Nice photos!
As far as the car goes it was one of my first custom paint and lettering jobs. The car started out as a undecorated Athearn 40’ boxcar. I painted it with Folk Art Barnyard Red and decaled it from a Walthers decal set. Prior to sending it into the Interchange I upgraded it by painting the undercarriage and changing the wheels from Proto 33” metal wheels to 36” metal. I changed the wheels because it needed the extra height to meet the Kadee coupler gauge. With the 33” wheels I had to use Kadee washers on the trucks but the car sat high and did not look right. I am slowly changing wheels on all my Athearn 40’ boxcars to fix this problem. The car was originally weathered by drybrushing and a wash. Before it left the RK&M I did some additional weathering with the airbrush.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/03/2005 09:07:13 AM
Message:

Fred,
Both the speeder and the weed sprayer are neat little models![:-thumbu]

Allen,
Those are some great shots.

Tom,
Very nice weathering job.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/03/2005 09:07:13 AM
Message:

Fred,
Both the speeder and the weed sprayer are neat little models![:-thumbu]

Allen,
Those are some great shots.

Tom,
Very nice weathering job.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/03/2005 09:14:41 AM
Message:

Thanks Bruce!

Here is a hopper that I recently made a coal load for. I also re-weathered it with the airbrush.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/03/2005 09:14:41 AM
Message:

Thanks Bruce!

Here is a hopper that I recently made a coal load for. I also re-weathered it with the airbrush.


Reply author: Drew
Replied on: 05/03/2005 09:43:05 AM
Message:

Wow! these are all some stunning photos, guys!
This was a great idea for a theme this month! [:-thumbu]

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

....Drew, what do you have left to do on the flatcar?....



Bruce,
I still need to come up with some kind of a brake wheel for the car…I'm also going to letter it for the Ky Rock & Asphalt Co.
Anybody know where I can get an O scale narrow gauge style brakewheel?
I found an O scale brakewheel on the Grandt Line site, but it was a more modern type…


Reply author: Drew
Replied on: 05/03/2005 09:43:05 AM
Message:

Wow! these are all some stunning photos, guys!
This was a great idea for a theme this month! [:-thumbu]

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

....Drew, what do you have left to do on the flatcar?....



Bruce,
I still need to come up with some kind of a brake wheel for the car…I'm also going to letter it for the Ky Rock & Asphalt Co.
Anybody know where I can get an O scale narrow gauge style brakewheel?
I found an O scale brakewheel on the Grandt Line site, but it was a more modern type…


Reply author: davidray
Replied on: 05/03/2005 10:01:13 AM
Message:

Drew, Foothill has a new wheel that might work at http://home.inreach.com/jkitts/DetailPt.html#FMW4001 .


Reply author: davidray
Replied on: 05/03/2005 10:01:13 AM
Message:

Drew, Foothill has a new wheel that might work at http://home.inreach.com/jkitts/DetailPt.html#FMW4001 .


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/03/2005 10:14:06 AM
Message:

The WVRR can finally store its plow until next winter....



Chuck


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/03/2005 10:14:06 AM
Message:

The WVRR can finally store its plow until next winter....



Chuck


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/03/2005 10:32:17 AM
Message:

An excellent scene, Chuck![:-thumbu] The snow plow is a beauty!

I especially like the "layering" of the buildings from foreground to background. It's a very realistic appearance!


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/03/2005 10:32:17 AM
Message:

An excellent scene, Chuck![:-thumbu] The snow plow is a beauty!

I especially like the "layering" of the buildings from foreground to background. It's a very realistic appearance!


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/03/2005 10:36:48 AM
Message:

Here's one of the OVT&L's old water cars. It's been left on the siding next to the Osage Valley's machine shop.




Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/03/2005 10:36:48 AM
Message:

Here's one of the OVT&L's old water cars. It's been left on the siding next to the Osage Valley's machine shop.




Reply author: Drew
Replied on: 05/03/2005 11:47:08 AM
Message:

David,
Thanks for the link!
Chuck,
Nice photo! I love the urban scenery!
Mike,
That rusty ol' tank is one of my favorites! [:-thumbu]

Here’s some rolling stock from my former N scale days…
My friend Mike (Tyson Rayles) sent me the boxcar from his freelance Nantahale Midland RR in NC…he painted & lettered it himself…
The gondola is one I lettered for my K&I RR…
I took the picture on my K&I switching layout...



Reply author: Drew
Replied on: 05/03/2005 11:47:08 AM
Message:

David,
Thanks for the link!
Chuck,
Nice photo! I love the urban scenery!
Mike,
That rusty ol' tank is one of my favorites! [:-thumbu]

Here’s some rolling stock from my former N scale days…
My friend Mike (Tyson Rayles) sent me the boxcar from his freelance Nantahale Midland RR in NC…he painted & lettered it himself…
The gondola is one I lettered for my K&I RR…
I took the picture on my K&I switching layout...



Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/03/2005 12:55:06 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by wvrr

Looks great, Eric! I'll add my version of the WYoming Valley:



Chuck



Chuck that's one sharp looking boxcar. I like the color scheme, it reminds me of my college colors. If I modeled a more modern era, it's one that I'd use, too.


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/03/2005 12:55:06 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by wvrr

Looks great, Eric! I'll add my version of the WYoming Valley:



Chuck



Chuck that's one sharp looking boxcar. I like the color scheme, it reminds me of my college colors. If I modeled a more modern era, it's one that I'd use, too.


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/03/2005 1:21:35 PM
Message:

Eric,

I thought of actually "backdating it" with a smaller yellow logo and lettering (which I have) on a boxcar red car. I really like "The Anthracite Route" of yours. Interested in an exchange?[:-bulb]

Chuck


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/03/2005 1:21:35 PM
Message:

Eric,

I thought of actually "backdating it" with a smaller yellow logo and lettering (which I have) on a boxcar red car. I really like "The Anthracite Route" of yours. Interested in an exchange?[:-bulb]

Chuck


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/04/2005 03:06:49 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by wvrr

The WVRR can finally store its plow until next winter....
Chuck


Oddly enough, The TC&W is also towing its plow into the shops right now for the summer.

Chuck,
What is the origin of your plow? I Don't recognize the kit, or is it scratchbuilt? Mine started out as the old Ambroid B&M plow kit which I modified and superdetailed.

I believe that an HO model of this type of plow isn't currently available. Examples of the Ambroid (or Northeastern) kit are still easy to find on Ebay.
-Dave


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/04/2005 03:06:49 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by wvrr

The WVRR can finally store its plow until next winter....
Chuck


Oddly enough, The TC&W is also towing its plow into the shops right now for the summer.

Chuck,
What is the origin of your plow? I Don't recognize the kit, or is it scratchbuilt? Mine started out as the old Ambroid B&M plow kit which I modified and superdetailed.

I believe that an HO model of this type of plow isn't currently available. Examples of the Ambroid (or Northeastern) kit are still easy to find on Ebay.
-Dave


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/04/2005 03:35:42 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

Here's one of the OVT&L's old water cars.

Mike,
Better rust and lime cannot be modeled by man nor beast.
-Dave


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/04/2005 03:35:42 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

Here's one of the OVT&L's old water cars.

Mike,
Better rust and lime cannot be modeled by man nor beast.
-Dave


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/04/2005 04:08:12 AM
Message:

Chuck,

That's a really nice picture of your plow; it looks like it recently came out of your fab shop, and spray booth.

Allen
Modelling the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by wvrr

The WVRR can finally store its plow until next winter....


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/04/2005 04:08:12 AM
Message:

Chuck,

That's a really nice picture of your plow; it looks like it recently came out of your fab shop, and spray booth.

Allen
Modelling the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by wvrr

The WVRR can finally store its plow until next winter....


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/04/2005 04:17:57 AM
Message:

Mike,

I've always been amazed by single truck cars and your's look so real. I was curious as to how the structure is mounted to the truck. It would seem to me that single truck cars would be susceptable to up-ending or turning-overs, especially tank cars. Guess this is more of a proto question?

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

Here's one of the OVT&L's old water cars. It's been left on the siding next to the Osage Valley's machine shop. . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/04/2005 04:17:57 AM
Message:

Mike,

I've always been amazed by single truck cars and your's look so real. I was curious as to how the structure is mounted to the truck. It would seem to me that single truck cars would be susceptable to up-ending or turning-overs, especially tank cars. Guess this is more of a proto question?

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

Here's one of the OVT&L's old water cars. It's been left on the siding next to the Osage Valley's machine shop. . .


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/04/2005 06:27:43 AM
Message:

Dave,

It is a Walthers kit that came out 8-10 years ago. They are no longer available.

Chuck


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/04/2005 06:27:43 AM
Message:

Dave,

It is a Walthers kit that came out 8-10 years ago. They are no longer available.

Chuck


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/04/2005 07:06:23 AM
Message:

Tom, once again, nice weathering on that hopper.

Mike, that's a little beauty!

Drew, it is good to see both the Nantahala Midland and the K&I living on in photos.

Chuck & Dave, the Green Mountain RR has one of those plows in their yard by the roundhouse in Walpole, NH. Unfortunately, the only picture that I took was from the car while driving by.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/04/2005 07:06:23 AM
Message:

Tom, once again, nice weathering on that hopper.

Mike, that's a little beauty!

Drew, it is good to see both the Nantahala Midland and the K&I living on in photos.

Chuck & Dave, the Green Mountain RR has one of those plows in their yard by the roundhouse in Walpole, NH. Unfortunately, the only picture that I took was from the car while driving by.


Reply author: Bbags
Replied on: 05/04/2005 07:50:41 AM
Message:

Great pictures everyone.

Chuck,
I have the same plow that is about half finished.
I got to the point where you assemble the wings and had so much trouble with them I just stopped.
I guess the secret is to model them in the closed position and not open as I was trying to do.


Reply author: Bbags
Replied on: 05/04/2005 07:50:41 AM
Message:

Great pictures everyone.

Chuck,
I have the same plow that is about half finished.
I got to the point where you assemble the wings and had so much trouble with them I just stopped.
I guess the secret is to model them in the closed position and not open as I was trying to do.


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/04/2005 08:30:43 AM
Message:

John,

That's exactly what I did. They aren't worth the trouble to build them so they are operable, per the instructions. Another tip with this model...add more weight. I need to open mine back up and add more. It derails often since it is so light.

Chuck


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/04/2005 08:30:43 AM
Message:

John,

That's exactly what I did. They aren't worth the trouble to build them so they are operable, per the instructions. Another tip with this model...add more weight. I need to open mine back up and add more. It derails often since it is so light.

Chuck


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/04/2005 09:35:32 AM
Message:

Thanks for the comments, guys.

Allen, I don't know how the prototype does it, but I suspect it's somewhat more involved than the 1-72 brass screw that I used.


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/04/2005 09:35:32 AM
Message:

Thanks for the comments, guys.

Allen, I don't know how the prototype does it, but I suspect it's somewhat more involved than the 1-72 brass screw that I used.


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/04/2005 09:48:03 AM
Message:

One more of the OVT&L's water tanker...




Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/04/2005 09:48:03 AM
Message:

One more of the OVT&L's water tanker...




Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/04/2005 10:50:12 AM
Message:

Great stuff everyone!

How about some reefers?






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/04/2005 10:50:12 AM
Message:

Great stuff everyone!

How about some reefers?






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/04/2005 11:04:40 AM
Message:

And a few more modern ones.




Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/04/2005 11:04:40 AM
Message:

And a few more modern ones.




Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/04/2005 1:22:01 PM
Message:

Nice, Tom. I have a Hershey car that I need to put together, too.

Chuck


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/04/2005 1:22:01 PM
Message:

Nice, Tom. I have a Hershey car that I need to put together, too.

Chuck


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/04/2005 1:25:50 PM
Message:

I have thoroughly enjoyed this month's gallery. The thing that really appeals to me is the variation of colors. Rolling stock really lets it all hang out. Thanks everyone for contributing; looks like I need to find a few of my own to post.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/04/2005 1:25:50 PM
Message:

I have thoroughly enjoyed this month's gallery. The thing that really appeals to me is the variation of colors. Rolling stock really lets it all hang out. Thanks everyone for contributing; looks like I need to find a few of my own to post.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!


Reply author: k9wrangler
Replied on: 05/04/2005 3:50:42 PM
Message:

Mmmmmmmm Chocolate Milk!

Tanks, TOM!


Reply author: k9wrangler
Replied on: 05/04/2005 3:50:42 PM
Message:

Mmmmmmmm Chocolate Milk!

Tanks, TOM!


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/04/2005 7:23:52 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by TomPM


How about some reefers?


You call those reefers? THIS is a reefer!

-Dave


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/04/2005 7:23:52 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by TomPM


How about some reefers?


You call those reefers? THIS is a reefer!

-Dave


Reply author: Bbags
Replied on: 05/04/2005 7:47:01 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by wvrr

John,

That's exactly what I did. They aren't worth the trouble to build them so they are operable, per the instructions. Another tip with this model...add more weight. I need to open mine back up and add more. It derails often since it is so light.

Chuck



Thanks Chuck for the tip about the extra weight.
I just hope I still remember to add the weight when I get back to finishing the kit.


Reply author: Bbags
Replied on: 05/04/2005 7:47:01 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by wvrr

John,

That's exactly what I did. They aren't worth the trouble to build them so they are operable, per the instructions. Another tip with this model...add more weight. I need to open mine back up and add more. It derails often since it is so light.

Chuck



Thanks Chuck for the tip about the extra weight.
I just hope I still remember to add the weight when I get back to finishing the kit.


Reply author: fairbanks-op
Replied on: 05/04/2005 7:58:07 PM
Message:

10/13/1984, Alleghany VA, ACMX 417 Allis Chalmers fish belly flat car used to transport hydro-electric equipment to a Virgina Power dam in Bath County, VA. George Willard photo.

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/data/fairbanks-op/200554195347_Slide151978kb.jpg"] Slide151978kb.jpg


Reply author: fairbanks-op
Replied on: 05/04/2005 7:58:07 PM
Message:

10/13/1984, Alleghany VA, ACMX 417 Allis Chalmers fish belly flat car used to transport hydro-electric equipment to a Virgina Power dam in Bath County, VA. George Willard photo.

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/data/fairbanks-op/200554195347_Slide151978kb.jpg"] Slide151978kb.jpg


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/04/2005 8:00:34 PM
Message:

Mike,
Do you know how well those cute little buggers track?

Tom,
Boy do I have a weakness for billboard reefers. Yours are very nicely weathered, too.

Dave,
Do you think that guy is wondering if they can move that car without it falling apart? BTW, does anyone make a model of that vintage wood sided truss bar reefer?


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/04/2005 8:00:34 PM
Message:

Mike,
Do you know how well those cute little buggers track?

Tom,
Boy do I have a weakness for billboard reefers. Yours are very nicely weathered, too.

Dave,
Do you think that guy is wondering if they can move that car without it falling apart? BTW, does anyone make a model of that vintage wood sided truss bar reefer?


Reply author: Bbags
Replied on: 05/04/2005 8:06:37 PM
Message:

Following up on the pictures posted by Chuck and Dave here is the prototype plow that is still used by the Alaska Railroad.
Picture from John Combs web site
www.Alaskarails.org
I have the Walthers kit about half done somewhere in a box that still has not been unpacked from my move.
Some day I hope to be able to post a picture of the model.
Maybe sometime in 2006 Bruce in case you are watching we can have another rolling stock theme.




Reply author: Bbags
Replied on: 05/04/2005 8:06:37 PM
Message:

Following up on the pictures posted by Chuck and Dave here is the prototype plow that is still used by the Alaska Railroad.
Picture from John Combs web site
www.Alaskarails.org
I have the Walthers kit about half done somewhere in a box that still has not been unpacked from my move.
Some day I hope to be able to post a picture of the model.
Maybe sometime in 2006 Bruce in case you are watching we can have another rolling stock theme.




Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/04/2005 9:18:32 PM
Message:

Well Dave,

That looks like the mother of all reefers alright![:-thumbu]

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Thorn Creek and Western

. . .You call those reefers? THIS is a reefer! . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/04/2005 9:18:32 PM
Message:

Well Dave,

That looks like the mother of all reefers alright![:-thumbu]

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Thorn Creek and Western

. . .You call those reefers? THIS is a reefer! . .


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/04/2005 10:14:52 PM
Message:

Here are a few of my billboard reefers. All are Athearn blue box kits. The only one that I have begun to weather is the Kraft reefer.






Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/04/2005 10:14:52 PM
Message:

Here are a few of my billboard reefers. All are Athearn blue box kits. The only one that I have begun to weather is the Kraft reefer.






Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/05/2005 06:16:51 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by anbhurst

Well Dave,
That looks like the mother of all reefers alright![:-thumbu]
Allen


Yowza! That thing is 60' long if it's an inch! Makes you wonder what were they thinking. Milk, which is mostly water, is VERY HEAVY! ...And probably turned into whipped cream after a long ride in this rickity thing.

Bruce: I believe there WAS a kit of this car made years ago. In fact I think I got the pic from an auction photo of the instruction sheet. Now, the kicker is that I can't remember who made the kit. I've done a Google and Ebay search with no useful results. Anybody know? LaBelle, perhaps?

TomPM: I recently read an article in "The Model Railroader" for September, 1940 by George Allen lamenting the demise of billboard reefers. Yeah, I'm that far behind in my reading!

These were banned in 1935 due mostly to complaints from l.c.l. shippers to the I.C.C. (If you didn't own your own reefer you couldn't advertise. DUH!)

One fact in the article I found particularly interesting was that in an Autumn 1919 A.R.A. test a typical reefer going cross-country consumed 47.2 pounds of ice per hour.
-Dave


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/05/2005 06:16:51 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by anbhurst

Well Dave,
That looks like the mother of all reefers alright![:-thumbu]
Allen


Yowza! That thing is 60' long if it's an inch! Makes you wonder what were they thinking. Milk, which is mostly water, is VERY HEAVY! ...And probably turned into whipped cream after a long ride in this rickity thing.

Bruce: I believe there WAS a kit of this car made years ago. In fact I think I got the pic from an auction photo of the instruction sheet. Now, the kicker is that I can't remember who made the kit. I've done a Google and Ebay search with no useful results. Anybody know? LaBelle, perhaps?

TomPM: I recently read an article in "The Model Railroader" for September, 1940 by George Allen lamenting the demise of billboard reefers. Yeah, I'm that far behind in my reading!

These were banned in 1935 due mostly to complaints from l.c.l. shippers to the I.C.C. (If you didn't own your own reefer you couldn't advertise. DUH!)

One fact in the article I found particularly interesting was that in an Autumn 1919 A.R.A. test a typical reefer going cross-country consumed 47.2 pounds of ice per hour.
-Dave


Reply author: belg
Replied on: 05/05/2005 06:30:04 AM
Message:

Dave I love facts like the amount of ice used but am hoping you can tell me was it in the early autumn or closer to winter as the temperature would surely affect the outcome of this trial.Pat


Reply author: belg
Replied on: 05/05/2005 06:30:04 AM
Message:

Dave I love facts like the amount of ice used but am hoping you can tell me was it in the early autumn or closer to winter as the temperature would surely affect the outcome of this trial.Pat


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/05/2005 09:36:10 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Mike,
Do you know how well those cute little buggers track?





Bruce, since I currently have only about 20' (total) of track wired, the work train cars don't get run often - or far. The one-truck cars seem to track okay over that little bit, but it really isn't much of a test.


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/05/2005 09:36:10 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Mike,
Do you know how well those cute little buggers track?





Bruce, since I currently have only about 20' (total) of track wired, the work train cars don't get run often - or far. The one-truck cars seem to track okay over that little bit, but it really isn't much of a test.


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/05/2005 12:11:35 PM
Message:

Here are a few more of my cars.


The RPO is a Walters Trainline (aka Rivarossi) model that I painted and lettered. Modifications include vents and window glazing from Bethlehem Car Works, body mounted Kadee #58 couplers and I replaced the brake handles with brake wheels and chains I had in the spare parts box. I also painted the interior, added three mail clerks and even some mail.

Since a lot of pictures of reefers and milk cars have been posted, I'll post a couple, too.


This is a milk car of unknown manufacturer. It belonged to a former member of my club and I bought it after he died. I repainted it, replaced the roof walk with one from American Model Builders and added stirrup steps I made from staples.


This is a Branchline reefer that I repainted.


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/05/2005 12:11:35 PM
Message:

Here are a few more of my cars.


The RPO is a Walters Trainline (aka Rivarossi) model that I painted and lettered. Modifications include vents and window glazing from Bethlehem Car Works, body mounted Kadee #58 couplers and I replaced the brake handles with brake wheels and chains I had in the spare parts box. I also painted the interior, added three mail clerks and even some mail.

Since a lot of pictures of reefers and milk cars have been posted, I'll post a couple, too.


This is a milk car of unknown manufacturer. It belonged to a former member of my club and I bought it after he died. I repainted it, replaced the roof walk with one from American Model Builders and added stirrup steps I made from staples.


This is a Branchline reefer that I repainted.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/05/2005 10:39:16 PM
Message:

Eric, nice reefers, and I love the Express truck meeting the RPO!

Here is one of my oldest pieces of rolling stock. It is a Varney tank car. The only recent upgrade are the couplers.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/05/2005 10:39:16 PM
Message:

Eric, nice reefers, and I love the Express truck meeting the RPO!

Here is one of my oldest pieces of rolling stock. It is a Varney tank car. The only recent upgrade are the couplers.


Reply author: audiojim
Replied on: 05/06/2005 08:41:38 AM
Message:

Normally I just lurk on these threads and gain from the experience and talent, but I have something to share for a change. This is my first weather/bash project. I removed the roof walk cut down the ladders and lowered the brake wheel assembly to represent this car as it could be seen late in it's lifespan. It's an Atlas O model.




from Atlas O


from fallenflags.org


Reply author: audiojim
Replied on: 05/06/2005 08:41:38 AM
Message:

Normally I just lurk on these threads and gain from the experience and talent, but I have something to share for a change. This is my first weather/bash project. I removed the roof walk cut down the ladders and lowered the brake wheel assembly to represent this car as it could be seen late in it's lifespan. It's an Atlas O model.




from Atlas O


from fallenflags.org


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/06/2005 09:10:31 AM
Message:

Bruce
Great looking reefers!
The tank car looks great!

Eric
Nice looking RPO and reefers!

Jim
Awesome looking car!


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/06/2005 09:10:31 AM
Message:

Bruce
Great looking reefers!
The tank car looks great!

Eric
Nice looking RPO and reefers!

Jim
Awesome looking car!


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/06/2005 10:23:47 PM
Message:

Looks like everyone is happy with the topic this month .
I like MoW rolling stock such as this fine looking crane :



Terry


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/06/2005 10:23:47 PM
Message:

Looks like everyone is happy with the topic this month .
I like MoW rolling stock such as this fine looking crane :



Terry


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/06/2005 10:44:16 PM
Message:

Jim,
Nice job on both the modifications and the weathering. Thanks for posting the picture.

Terry,
I am also a fan of MOW equipment. Here is a somewhat smaller crane that often sits in the small yard near the port in Morehead City, NC.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/06/2005 10:44:16 PM
Message:

Jim,
Nice job on both the modifications and the weathering. Thanks for posting the picture.

Terry,
I am also a fan of MOW equipment. Here is a somewhat smaller crane that often sits in the small yard near the port in Morehead City, NC.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/06/2005 11:48:25 PM
Message:

Nice looking cranes guys!

Remember this one? It was from when I was making my eChristmas card.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/06/2005 11:48:25 PM
Message:

Nice looking cranes guys!

Remember this one? It was from when I was making my eChristmas card.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/07/2005 07:27:58 AM
Message:

Tom, I indeed do remember that beauty.

Here are two smaller cranes. The first is a tie crane operated by MetroNorth RR.



This one sits on top of gondolas and lifts ties out while the train stops along the ROW. This is operated by New Jersey Transit.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/07/2005 07:27:58 AM
Message:

Tom, I indeed do remember that beauty.

Here are two smaller cranes. The first is a tie crane operated by MetroNorth RR.



This one sits on top of gondolas and lifts ties out while the train stops along the ROW. This is operated by New Jersey Transit.


Reply author: jon grant 4472
Replied on: 05/08/2005 11:11:09 AM
Message:

I got stuck into some heavy weathering over the last week or so. They are all done with acrylic washes and drtbrushing. Theres some other pics on the HO forum












Jon


Reply author: jon grant 4472
Replied on: 05/08/2005 11:11:09 AM
Message:

I got stuck into some heavy weathering over the last week or so. They are all done with acrylic washes and drtbrushing. Theres some other pics on the HO forum












Jon


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/08/2005 2:18:09 PM
Message:

Did somebody say MoW?[:-eyebrows]

Here's one of the OVT&L's ballast cars waiting for pickup.




Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/08/2005 2:18:09 PM
Message:

Did somebody say MoW?[:-eyebrows]

Here's one of the OVT&L's ballast cars waiting for pickup.




Reply author: audiojim
Replied on: 05/08/2005 6:59:44 PM
Message:

Bruce and Tom,

Thanks for the kind words. It's a start! Learning from everyone here.


Reply author: audiojim
Replied on: 05/08/2005 6:59:44 PM
Message:

Bruce and Tom,

Thanks for the kind words. It's a start! Learning from everyone here.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/08/2005 8:15:01 PM
Message:

Bruce
Cool shots!

Jon
Great job on the weathering!

Mike
That is a cool looking car!


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/08/2005 8:15:01 PM
Message:

Bruce
Cool shots!

Jon
Great job on the weathering!

Mike
That is a cool looking car!


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/08/2005 8:21:08 PM
Message:

OK here are some more work train photos!








Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/08/2005 8:21:08 PM
Message:

OK here are some more work train photos!








Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/08/2005 8:26:07 PM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/08/2005 8:26:07 PM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/08/2005 8:29:52 PM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/08/2005 8:29:52 PM
Message:






Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/09/2005 02:30:40 AM
Message:

Tom,

Those have to be some terrific pictures; wish I could get mine focused as clear as you do. Thanks for sharing. I especially enjoyed your weathering of the tank car and the wrecking cranes are one of my favorites.

Allen
From the soggy West as in domicile!

quote:
Originally posted by TomPM

OK here are some more work train photos! . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/09/2005 02:30:40 AM
Message:

Tom,

Those have to be some terrific pictures; wish I could get mine focused as clear as you do. Thanks for sharing. I especially enjoyed your weathering of the tank car and the wrecking cranes are one of my favorites.

Allen
From the soggy West as in domicile!

quote:
Originally posted by TomPM

OK here are some more work train photos! . .


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/09/2005 06:11:53 AM
Message:

Jon, that is some nice weathering, thanks for posting.

Mike, are we allowed to use the adjective "cute" to describe rolling stock? That is a cute neat little ballast car.

Tom, that is a great sequence of pictures!


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/09/2005 06:11:53 AM
Message:

Jon, that is some nice weathering, thanks for posting.

Mike, are we allowed to use the adjective "cute" to describe rolling stock? That is a cute neat little ballast car.

Tom, that is a great sequence of pictures!


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/09/2005 1:34:58 PM
Message:

Great work and shots everyone! Here are a few more photos. None of MOW cars (alas, I don't have any yet).


This is an Accurail stock car that I added Westerfield solid doors, Tichy KC brake and brake wheel, scratch-built straight center sill, Accurail Andrews trucks, and Kadee No. 5 couplers and wheels.


This is a Bowser GS gondola that I painted and lettered for the Wyoming Valley. Modifications include Walters arch bar trucks with NWSL wheels, Tichy KD brake and Kadee No. 5 couplers.


This is an Atlas 36' meat reefer decorated for Cudahy and Old Dutch Cleanser. This is a great little car and truly as ready-to-run as any car on the market. All I added were Kadee No. 58 couplers and some light weathering.


This an old AHM/Roco reefer that I got when I was in high school (30 years ago). I have owned this car longer than any other, except one. I gave it to my younger son (I purchased the Branchline kit in the same scheme) and it still sees regular duty on my club's layout. I added body-mounted Kadee No. 5 couplers, Accurail trucks, Kadee wheels and some additional weight.


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/09/2005 1:34:58 PM
Message:

Great work and shots everyone! Here are a few more photos. None of MOW cars (alas, I don't have any yet).


This is an Accurail stock car that I added Westerfield solid doors, Tichy KC brake and brake wheel, scratch-built straight center sill, Accurail Andrews trucks, and Kadee No. 5 couplers and wheels.


This is a Bowser GS gondola that I painted and lettered for the Wyoming Valley. Modifications include Walters arch bar trucks with NWSL wheels, Tichy KD brake and Kadee No. 5 couplers.


This is an Atlas 36' meat reefer decorated for Cudahy and Old Dutch Cleanser. This is a great little car and truly as ready-to-run as any car on the market. All I added were Kadee No. 58 couplers and some light weathering.


This an old AHM/Roco reefer that I got when I was in high school (30 years ago). I have owned this car longer than any other, except one. I gave it to my younger son (I purchased the Branchline kit in the same scheme) and it still sees regular duty on my club's layout. I added body-mounted Kadee No. 5 couplers, Accurail trucks, Kadee wheels and some additional weight.


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/10/2005 03:15:10 AM
Message:

Below is a photo
of a very well-
known prototype
which I know you've
read about many
times, but probably
have never actually seen.
Without further
ado, here is a piece of
rolling stock from the real

UNDECORATED RAILROAD!

-Dave


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/10/2005 03:15:10 AM
Message:

Below is a photo
of a very well-
known prototype
which I know you've
read about many
times, but probably
have never actually seen.
Without further
ado, here is a piece of
rolling stock from the real

UNDECORATED RAILROAD!

-Dave


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/10/2005 04:53:51 AM
Message:

Eric,

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think N&W had very many stock cars. I think that is the first one I've seen modelled. Who is its manufacturer?

Thanks,

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Eric Norris

Great work and shots everyone! Here are a few more photos. None of MOW cars (alas, I don't have any yet). . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/10/2005 04:53:51 AM
Message:

Eric,

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think N&W had very many stock cars. I think that is the first one I've seen modelled. Who is its manufacturer?

Thanks,

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Eric Norris

Great work and shots everyone! Here are a few more photos. None of MOW cars (alas, I don't have any yet). . .


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/10/2005 06:30:35 AM
Message:

Eric, thanks for posting the pics of those great models and for describing both their origns and your modifications.

Dave, that is a great closeup of an outside braced boxcar.

Here is a picture of a woodchip gondola that is no longer "rolling".

I came across this wrecked car in Warwick, New York this winter. It is on the old Lehigh & New England line, now operated by the Susquehanna. They were using the gondola to transport construction debris. Either they had it overloaded, or the car was getting old, or both. It just broke apart here. Interesting, this line is right next to a road, so the carted the junk away by truck, and used a truck based crane to move the car off the tracks. The only things that they are likely to salvage are the trucks. This sat there for several weeks.






Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/10/2005 06:30:35 AM
Message:

Eric, thanks for posting the pics of those great models and for describing both their origns and your modifications.

Dave, that is a great closeup of an outside braced boxcar.

Here is a picture of a woodchip gondola that is no longer "rolling".

I came across this wrecked car in Warwick, New York this winter. It is on the old Lehigh & New England line, now operated by the Susquehanna. They were using the gondola to transport construction debris. Either they had it overloaded, or the car was getting old, or both. It just broke apart here. Interesting, this line is right next to a road, so the carted the junk away by truck, and used a truck based crane to move the car off the tracks. The only things that they are likely to salvage are the trucks. This sat there for several weeks.






Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/10/2005 10:07:24 AM
Message:

Cute??? [:-bigeyes2]

Tom, your station diorama is a great backdrop for some really nicely weahthered rolling stock![:-thumbu]

I really like those billboard reefers, Eric!

Undecorated, unlettered, and in red even. What will Walthers think of next, Dave....

Bruce, I was looking at the rust on the bulkheads and the trucks/wheels. Both the color and the texture make a great study for weathering.

-----------------------------

Here's the OVT&L's blacksmith car. A small gon loaded with stovewood trails behind.




Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/10/2005 10:07:24 AM
Message:

Cute??? [:-bigeyes2]

Tom, your station diorama is a great backdrop for some really nicely weahthered rolling stock![:-thumbu]

I really like those billboard reefers, Eric!

Undecorated, unlettered, and in red even. What will Walthers think of next, Dave....

Bruce, I was looking at the rust on the bulkheads and the trucks/wheels. Both the color and the texture make a great study for weathering.

-----------------------------

Here's the OVT&L's blacksmith car. A small gon loaded with stovewood trails behind.




Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/10/2005 11:36:20 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by anbhurst

Eric,

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think N&W had very many stock cars. I think that is the first one I've seen modeled. Who is its manufacturer?

Thanks,

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!




Allen,

I can't attest to the quantity of stock cars that the Norfolk and Western had, but they did have some and Accurail did make the model with a correct number. In this case the 29000 series was rebuilt by N & W from boxcars in 1935. As rebuilt, they used the original boxcar doors, hence the solid doors. They also had Andrews trucks, KC brakes and straight center sills. I made the modifications to the Accurail model based on a prototype photo I found on the New England, Berkshire and Western Model Railroad web site.


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/10/2005 11:36:20 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by anbhurst

Eric,

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think N&W had very many stock cars. I think that is the first one I've seen modeled. Who is its manufacturer?

Thanks,

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!




Allen,

I can't attest to the quantity of stock cars that the Norfolk and Western had, but they did have some and Accurail did make the model with a correct number. In this case the 29000 series was rebuilt by N & W from boxcars in 1935. As rebuilt, they used the original boxcar doors, hence the solid doors. They also had Andrews trucks, KC brakes and straight center sills. I made the modifications to the Accurail model based on a prototype photo I found on the New England, Berkshire and Western Model Railroad web site.


Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 05/10/2005 2:31:52 PM
Message:

This is a Tichy model of a rebuilt box car that I'm using to model older, rebuilt rolling stock. Cars such as these may have been 'war emergency' composite cars or outside braced wood cars from the '20s or '30s. If the underframes and steel ends were structurally sound, they could be rebuilt with upgrades such as newer trucks, 'AB' brake system, newer doors, new roof, grabs, ladders, and steel sheathing. The Plano roof walk has to have the buckle taken out, some grabs added to the roof end walks, a little cleaning up, and it'll be ready for the paint shop. These photos are from my [:-love]'s new Canon A95 Powershot. It doesn't do close-ups very well, so a separate close-up lens will have to be put on the wish list.




Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 05/10/2005 2:31:52 PM
Message:

This is a Tichy model of a rebuilt box car that I'm using to model older, rebuilt rolling stock. Cars such as these may have been 'war emergency' composite cars or outside braced wood cars from the '20s or '30s. If the underframes and steel ends were structurally sound, they could be rebuilt with upgrades such as newer trucks, 'AB' brake system, newer doors, new roof, grabs, ladders, and steel sheathing. The Plano roof walk has to have the buckle taken out, some grabs added to the roof end walks, a little cleaning up, and it'll be ready for the paint shop. These photos are from my [:-love]'s new Canon A95 Powershot. It doesn't do close-ups very well, so a separate close-up lens will have to be put on the wish list.




Reply author: davidray
Replied on: 05/10/2005 4:32:17 PM
Message:

The camera may just be too close to the subject to focus properly. I try to back off the subject at least 18 inches and use the optical zoom if needed. Just a thought. The car work looks very nice.


Reply author: davidray
Replied on: 05/10/2005 4:32:17 PM
Message:

The camera may just be too close to the subject to focus properly. I try to back off the subject at least 18 inches and use the optical zoom if needed. Just a thought. The car work looks very nice.


Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 05/10/2005 5:02:20 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by davidray

The camera may just be too close to the subject to focus properly. I try to back off the subject at least 18 inches and use the optical zoom if needed. Just a thought. The car work looks very nice.


Thanks, Dave..I'm still trying to get used to this camera. I really like the rebuilts and war emergency cars...they have alot of character. I'm thinking in terms of a two-tone paint scheme...dark blue bottom 1/2 and medium grey upper 1/2. It'll go into the spraybooth this weekend.


Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 05/10/2005 5:02:20 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by davidray

The camera may just be too close to the subject to focus properly. I try to back off the subject at least 18 inches and use the optical zoom if needed. Just a thought. The car work looks very nice.


Thanks, Dave..I'm still trying to get used to this camera. I really like the rebuilts and war emergency cars...they have alot of character. I'm thinking in terms of a two-tone paint scheme...dark blue bottom 1/2 and medium grey upper 1/2. It'll go into the spraybooth this weekend.


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/10/2005 7:41:27 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by hudsonelectric

These photos are from my [:-love]'s new Canon A95 Powershot. It doesn't do close-ups very well, so a separate close-up lens will have to be put on the wish list.


Russ
I've posted this tip before but maybe this might be of help to those of us with lame digital cameras.

First: Put your camera on a tripod and get as close to your subject as you can while keeping it in sharp focus.

Second: Set your camera to its highest 'quality' setting. (This will generate a large file.)

Third: Crop the edges of the resulting photo until you get down to the area you want to portray. (You can use any imaging program-- I prefer Thumbs Plus.)

If you follow these steps you can create an image such as this:

-Dave


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/10/2005 7:41:27 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by hudsonelectric

These photos are from my [:-love]'s new Canon A95 Powershot. It doesn't do close-ups very well, so a separate close-up lens will have to be put on the wish list.


Russ
I've posted this tip before but maybe this might be of help to those of us with lame digital cameras.

First: Put your camera on a tripod and get as close to your subject as you can while keeping it in sharp focus.

Second: Set your camera to its highest 'quality' setting. (This will generate a large file.)

Third: Crop the edges of the resulting photo until you get down to the area you want to portray. (You can use any imaging program-- I prefer Thumbs Plus.)

If you follow these steps you can create an image such as this:

-Dave


Reply author: ANo10
Replied on: 05/10/2005 10:02:16 PM
Message:

Last Saturday, on the way to the current well, I passed two interesting sights.

The first is a gon being loaded with salt at United Salt mine near Carlsbad, NM. The front end loader operator can actually say he has been "slaving at the salt mines".



The second is a photo of a gondola/hopperloaded with potash on a spur headed to the main line at Carlsbad. What I thought interesting is that Southwestern Railroad still use a caboose.



Postscript:

I thought I had better explain. Even though the rolling stock is lettered ATSF, they are being operated by a local short line, the Southwestern Railroad. This RR operates from the mainline to the mines in and around Carlsbad.

Jim




Reply author: ANo10
Replied on: 05/10/2005 10:02:16 PM
Message:

Last Saturday, on the way to the current well, I passed two interesting sights.

The first is a gon being loaded with salt at United Salt mine near Carlsbad, NM. The front end loader operator can actually say he has been "slaving at the salt mines".



The second is a photo of a gondola/hopperloaded with potash on a spur headed to the main line at Carlsbad. What I thought interesting is that Southwestern Railroad still use a caboose.



Postscript:

I thought I had better explain. Even though the rolling stock is lettered ATSF, they are being operated by a local short line, the Southwestern Railroad. This RR operates from the mainline to the mines in and around Carlsbad.

Jim




Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/10/2005 10:21:03 PM
Message:

Russ, is there a basic tutorial on undercarriage piping available? When we visited Ira, he mentioned using the carbuilders encyclopedia drawings, but I would think that most modelers don't use that resource.

Jim, those are two commodities that we don't see on the rails in the Northeast. I wonder how many shortlines still use a caboose on their trains?


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/10/2005 10:21:03 PM
Message:

Russ, is there a basic tutorial on undercarriage piping available? When we visited Ira, he mentioned using the carbuilders encyclopedia drawings, but I would think that most modelers don't use that resource.

Jim, those are two commodities that we don't see on the rails in the Northeast. I wonder how many shortlines still use a caboose on their trains?


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/11/2005 12:09:17 AM
Message:

I've been wanting the Bachmann 250 Ton Crane and Boom Tender for a while and after seeing Tom's nicely weathered unit , I decided to buy . This is obviously untouched and right out of the box , in action on the Modular Club layout .






Next is my gon with the scrap metal load ...really just pencil sharpener shavings painted silver and rust .It's on a siding near J.Bagley & Sons Manufacturing on my home layout .



Great pics , everyone !
Terry


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/11/2005 12:09:17 AM
Message:

I've been wanting the Bachmann 250 Ton Crane and Boom Tender for a while and after seeing Tom's nicely weathered unit , I decided to buy . This is obviously untouched and right out of the box , in action on the Modular Club layout .






Next is my gon with the scrap metal load ...really just pencil sharpener shavings painted silver and rust .It's on a siding near J.Bagley & Sons Manufacturing on my home layout .



Great pics , everyone !
Terry


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/11/2005 07:54:22 AM
Message:

Terry, I've been looking for a crane car as well. I had a kit from Red Ball in my hands last Saturday, but decided against it (with input from Dave and Chuck). Maybe I will go for the Tichy kit -- maybe. I'm looking for a smaller crane than the Bachman kit.

Love that pencil shaving gondola load.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/11/2005 07:54:22 AM
Message:

Terry, I've been looking for a crane car as well. I had a kit from Red Ball in my hands last Saturday, but decided against it (with input from Dave and Chuck). Maybe I will go for the Tichy kit -- maybe. I'm looking for a smaller crane than the Bachman kit.

Love that pencil shaving gondola load.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/11/2005 08:23:16 AM
Message:

Mike
Great little car!

Jim
Nice shots!

Terry
Nice looking crane and tender! Cool job n the gondola and the load. I love the various methods that are used to model things. I have to try your pencil shavings method.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/11/2005 08:23:16 AM
Message:

Mike
Great little car!

Jim
Nice shots!

Terry
Nice looking crane and tender! Cool job n the gondola and the load. I love the various methods that are used to model things. I have to try your pencil shavings method.


Reply author: k9wrangler
Replied on: 05/11/2005 08:41:17 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Terry, I've been looking for a crane car as well. I had a kit from Red Ball in my hands last Saturday, but decided against it (with input from Dave and Chuck). Maybe I will go for the Tichy kit -- maybe. I'm looking for a smaller crane than the Bachman kit.

Love that pencil shaving gondola load.



Think about the Tichy kit crane and tender are both very nice models. The crane looks like an aweful lot of work but the instructions break it down in very logical, small steps that result in a very fine model. Both kits go together beautifully, all holes are pre-drilled and everything fits!



I've never gotten around to filling up the flatcar end with "stuff" yet.


Reply author: k9wrangler
Replied on: 05/11/2005 08:41:17 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Terry, I've been looking for a crane car as well. I had a kit from Red Ball in my hands last Saturday, but decided against it (with input from Dave and Chuck). Maybe I will go for the Tichy kit -- maybe. I'm looking for a smaller crane than the Bachman kit.

Love that pencil shaving gondola load.



Think about the Tichy kit crane and tender are both very nice models. The crane looks like an aweful lot of work but the instructions break it down in very logical, small steps that result in a very fine model. Both kits go together beautifully, all holes are pre-drilled and everything fits!



I've never gotten around to filling up the flatcar end with "stuff" yet.


Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 05/11/2005 09:31:38 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Russ, is there a basic tutorial on undercarriage piping available? When we visited Ira, he mentioned using the carbuilders encyclopedia drawings, but I would think that most modelers don't use that resource.


Bruce...

There is a diagram included in the Tichy AB brake detail set originally drawn and published in 'Mainline Modeler'. That's the one that I follow. I have some air brake books at home and I'll post diagrams, appropriate text, etc. when I get our new computer next week.

Russ [:-spin]


Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 05/11/2005 09:31:38 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Russ, is there a basic tutorial on undercarriage piping available? When we visited Ira, he mentioned using the carbuilders encyclopedia drawings, but I would think that most modelers don't use that resource.


Bruce...

There is a diagram included in the Tichy AB brake detail set originally drawn and published in 'Mainline Modeler'. That's the one that I follow. I have some air brake books at home and I'll post diagrams, appropriate text, etc. when I get our new computer next week.

Russ [:-spin]


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/11/2005 11:10:03 AM
Message:

That Tichy kit looks awesome ...I've never seen it for sale in a shop , or even at a vendor / train show .

The pencil shavings / scrap metal was an idea that Dean Freytag gave me . Dean is one of the best scroungers I've ever seen . In fact there is an annual ' Dean Freytag Award ' at the Steel Modellers Meet for the person who shows or displays the best ' use of junk ' in his modelling .Shelby Corbin won it last year .


Terry


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/11/2005 11:10:03 AM
Message:

That Tichy kit looks awesome ...I've never seen it for sale in a shop , or even at a vendor / train show .

The pencil shavings / scrap metal was an idea that Dean Freytag gave me . Dean is one of the best scroungers I've ever seen . In fact there is an annual ' Dean Freytag Award ' at the Steel Modellers Meet for the person who shows or displays the best ' use of junk ' in his modelling .Shelby Corbin won it last year .


Terry


Reply author: Drew
Replied on: 05/11/2005 2:20:19 PM
Message:

Great modeling & photos everyone!

While we’re on this rolling stock theme, I thought I’d post some pics of an N scale boxcar I kitbashed a couple of years back for my Poor Fork RR & Mining Co. layout…
This car started out as one of those Bachman “old time” freight cars...


I added MT archbar trucks & couplers, & repainted it for the fictional Versailles, Albany & London RR…these are the names of three towns in KY, the area I was modeling, & they also spell the name “VAL”, which is the name of one of my online buddies, who I believe is now a member of this forum, as well (Spitfire)…

Anyway, here’s how it turned out…(I did the kitbash in July of 2003, so I numbered it 703)


Reply author: Drew
Replied on: 05/11/2005 2:20:19 PM
Message:

Great modeling & photos everyone!

While we’re on this rolling stock theme, I thought I’d post some pics of an N scale boxcar I kitbashed a couple of years back for my Poor Fork RR & Mining Co. layout…
This car started out as one of those Bachman “old time” freight cars...


I added MT archbar trucks & couplers, & repainted it for the fictional Versailles, Albany & London RR…these are the names of three towns in KY, the area I was modeling, & they also spell the name “VAL”, which is the name of one of my online buddies, who I believe is now a member of this forum, as well (Spitfire)…

Anyway, here’s how it turned out…(I did the kitbash in July of 2003, so I numbered it 703)


Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 05/11/2005 3:24:07 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Drew

This car started out as one of those Bachman “old time” freight cars. Anyway, here’s how it turned out.


AHHHHH, YES......MUCH BETTER NOW!!


Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 05/11/2005 3:24:07 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Drew

This car started out as one of those Bachman “old time” freight cars. Anyway, here’s how it turned out.


AHHHHH, YES......MUCH BETTER NOW!!


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/11/2005 10:23:32 PM
Message:

Drew, that is a great transformation!

I pass the Suffern, NY yard that NS uses on my way to work each day. Usually, there are mainly covered hoppers with a smattering of tank cars and a few boxcars in the yard. Every once in a while, something catches my eye.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/11/2005 10:23:32 PM
Message:

Drew, that is a great transformation!

I pass the Suffern, NY yard that NS uses on my way to work each day. Usually, there are mainly covered hoppers with a smattering of tank cars and a few boxcars in the yard. Every once in a while, something catches my eye.


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/12/2005 01:07:22 AM
Message:

Terry,

Here's what happens when one just can't wait any longer after taking one of these out of the box:



Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

PS -BTW Terry, . .Are you going to convert your crane from steam to diesel?

quote:
Originally posted by teejay

I've been wanting the Bachmann 250 Ton Crane and Boom Tender for a while and after seeing Tom's nicely weathered unit , I decided to buy. . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/12/2005 01:07:22 AM
Message:

Terry,

Here's what happens when one just can't wait any longer after taking one of these out of the box:



Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

PS -BTW Terry, . .Are you going to convert your crane from steam to diesel?

quote:
Originally posted by teejay

I've been wanting the Bachmann 250 Ton Crane and Boom Tender for a while and after seeing Tom's nicely weathered unit , I decided to buy. . .


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/12/2005 3:09:51 PM
Message:

I'll be keeping mine steam , Allen . The crane and work caboose will need a lot of weathering to make them look right .

Terry


Reply author: teejay
Replied on: 05/12/2005 3:09:51 PM
Message:

I'll be keeping mine steam , Allen . The crane and work caboose will need a lot of weathering to make them look right .

Terry


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/13/2005 01:40:35 AM
Message:

To Bruce and the Crew,

Here are some more pictures of the Susie-Q Boxcar. I tried looking on the bottom of the car, but there were no identifying marks. Maybe someone will know who the manufacturer is after taking a look at the pictures of the bottom.











Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/13/2005 01:40:35 AM
Message:

To Bruce and the Crew,

Here are some more pictures of the Susie-Q Boxcar. I tried looking on the bottom of the car, but there were no identifying marks. Maybe someone will know who the manufacturer is after taking a look at the pictures of the bottom.











Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!


Reply author: Yellow signal
Replied on: 05/13/2005 07:28:28 AM
Message:

Dutchman, i don't believe i have ever seen your picture (http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=8840&whichpage=5), but here is my N-scale interpretation of it:


Reply author: Yellow signal
Replied on: 05/13/2005 07:28:28 AM
Message:

Dutchman, i don't believe i have ever seen your picture (http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=8840&whichpage=5), but here is my N-scale interpretation of it:


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/13/2005 08:11:10 AM
Message:

Erik,
That is it, Ok. Nice job. Actually, when you think of what they use that crane for, it was a good way to approach it.

Allen,
That is a distinctive underframe, but I don't recognize it.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/13/2005 08:11:10 AM
Message:

Erik,
That is it, Ok. Nice job. Actually, when you think of what they use that crane for, it was a good way to approach it.

Allen,
That is a distinctive underframe, but I don't recognize it.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/13/2005 10:13:19 AM
Message:

Wow this month's gallery has taken off. So many great pieces of rolling stock.

How about a little change of pace?

We'll call it the pink invasion.






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/13/2005 10:13:19 AM
Message:

Wow this month's gallery has taken off. So many great pieces of rolling stock.

How about a little change of pace?

We'll call it the pink invasion.






Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/13/2005 10:14:00 AM
Message:

This boxcar is the OVT&L's most recent acquisition. It was pressed into service right away, so it's still lettered for its former owner, the Deer Creek Land and Timber Co.



Actually, this is the last car I built for my OVT&L work train. I have several more I plan to build using white metal car frames from Rusty Stumps. I decided to take a break from building rolling stock, however, and haven't done any more since the boxcar.


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/13/2005 10:14:00 AM
Message:

This boxcar is the OVT&L's most recent acquisition. It was pressed into service right away, so it's still lettered for its former owner, the Deer Creek Land and Timber Co.



Actually, this is the last car I built for my OVT&L work train. I have several more I plan to build using white metal car frames from Rusty Stumps. I decided to take a break from building rolling stock, however, and haven't done any more since the boxcar.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/13/2005 10:16:15 AM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/13/2005 10:16:15 AM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/13/2005 10:18:02 AM
Message:




Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/13/2005 10:18:02 AM
Message:




Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/13/2005 5:02:41 PM
Message:

Tom, I remember when you were in your "pink phase" a couple of years back. They still look great, and the green PC caboose just adds the "exclamation point" to the whole invasion theme! Outstanding weathering on all of them, by the way! [:-thumbu]


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/13/2005 5:02:41 PM
Message:

Tom, I remember when you were in your "pink phase" a couple of years back. They still look great, and the green PC caboose just adds the "exclamation point" to the whole invasion theme! Outstanding weathering on all of them, by the way! [:-thumbu]


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/13/2005 6:27:36 PM
Message:

Tom,

Is the theme of that train "Pretty in Pink?" My daughter would find it very appealing. On the other hand, my sons would dismiss it as a "girl's train."

Very colorful!


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/13/2005 6:27:36 PM
Message:

Tom,

Is the theme of that train "Pretty in Pink?" My daughter would find it very appealing. On the other hand, my sons would dismiss it as a "girl's train."

Very colorful!


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/13/2005 9:04:16 PM
Message:

Thanks guys!

Eric
When I officially got back into modeling the first two kits I got were the Ralston-Jefferson hopper, and the Klemme Co-op hopper. They were selected by my daughter.

I have one each of Farnhamville, Albert City, and Ralston-Jefferson hoppers in various stages of assembly or weathering on the work bench. I also have an undecorated one that will be a Ralston-Jefferson hopper.

Now Athearn is releasing Farnhamville hoppers in their RTR line.

HO FMC Covered Hopper
http://www.athearn.com/newsletter/0505early/FMC_hop_2_0505_early.jpg
http://www.athearn.com/newsletter/0505early/FMC_hop_2_0505_early.pdf

Another one for the wishlist.

Mike
Great looking boxcar you snuck in there!


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/13/2005 9:04:16 PM
Message:

Thanks guys!

Eric
When I officially got back into modeling the first two kits I got were the Ralston-Jefferson hopper, and the Klemme Co-op hopper. They were selected by my daughter.

I have one each of Farnhamville, Albert City, and Ralston-Jefferson hoppers in various stages of assembly or weathering on the work bench. I also have an undecorated one that will be a Ralston-Jefferson hopper.

Now Athearn is releasing Farnhamville hoppers in their RTR line.

HO FMC Covered Hopper
http://www.athearn.com/newsletter/0505early/FMC_hop_2_0505_early.jpg
http://www.athearn.com/newsletter/0505early/FMC_hop_2_0505_early.pdf

Another one for the wishlist.

Mike
Great looking boxcar you snuck in there!


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/13/2005 9:18:09 PM
Message:

Tom,
Another nice sequence of pictures. Lately, there have been a number of CO-OP hoppers in the Suffern, NY yard. It is just getting harder and harder to find a place to take pictures without getting questioned.

Mike, was that boxcar a kit?


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/13/2005 9:18:09 PM
Message:

Tom,
Another nice sequence of pictures. Lately, there have been a number of CO-OP hoppers in the Suffern, NY yard. It is just getting harder and harder to find a place to take pictures without getting questioned.

Mike, was that boxcar a kit?


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/14/2005 09:09:43 AM
Message:

This Sperry car was on a siding in Suffern, NY for over a month this winter.




Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/14/2005 09:09:43 AM
Message:

This Sperry car was on a siding in Suffern, NY for over a month this winter.




Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/14/2005 11:43:59 PM
Message:

My Thorn Creek and Western is an imaginary short line which theoretically existed in West Virginia in 1942. One real WV railroad I've looked at a lot for inspiration is the now defunct Buffalo Creek and Gauley. I knew that Tichy made a really nice kit for a 120 ton Brownhoist crane, but when I saw this photo of the BC&G's X-5 I knew I had to build the kit:



Note that in the above photograph the only difference between the kit and the BC&G prototype is that there is a generator and a couple of whistles on the roof. Here is my version of the Tichy kit:

And another shot of it:



The TC&W shops decided to add a generator behind the stack and a headlight in front of it.
The Tichy kit is not for beginners, but is just plain BIG and delicate. The instructions are quite good. The only quarrel I have with the kit is that the cables are supposed to operate, but using the thread I was supplied with at least it ain't gonna happen.


All was well in sleepy Thorn Creek until I saw THIS photo:

I knew my work was only half done and I would have to scratchbuild a crane tender!

I'm going to stop here for the benefit of you dial-up Guys and Gals. Never fear, I'll be right back with the saga of the crane tender.
-Dave


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/14/2005 11:43:59 PM
Message:

My Thorn Creek and Western is an imaginary short line which theoretically existed in West Virginia in 1942. One real WV railroad I've looked at a lot for inspiration is the now defunct Buffalo Creek and Gauley. I knew that Tichy made a really nice kit for a 120 ton Brownhoist crane, but when I saw this photo of the BC&G's X-5 I knew I had to build the kit:



Note that in the above photograph the only difference between the kit and the BC&G prototype is that there is a generator and a couple of whistles on the roof. Here is my version of the Tichy kit:

And another shot of it:



The TC&W shops decided to add a generator behind the stack and a headlight in front of it.
The Tichy kit is not for beginners, but is just plain BIG and delicate. The instructions are quite good. The only quarrel I have with the kit is that the cables are supposed to operate, but using the thread I was supplied with at least it ain't gonna happen.


All was well in sleepy Thorn Creek until I saw THIS photo:

I knew my work was only half done and I would have to scratchbuild a crane tender!

I'm going to stop here for the benefit of you dial-up Guys and Gals. Never fear, I'll be right back with the saga of the crane tender.
-Dave


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/15/2005 12:22:15 AM
Message:

Hoppers, Sperry Cars, and Cranes, . .it doesn't get any better than that. This has been a great month for our gallery! Thanks everyone for posting those neat pictures.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Thorn Creek and Western

My Thorn Creek and Western is an imaginary short line which theoretically existed in West Virginia in 1942. . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/15/2005 12:22:15 AM
Message:

Hoppers, Sperry Cars, and Cranes, . .it doesn't get any better than that. This has been a great month for our gallery! Thanks everyone for posting those neat pictures.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Thorn Creek and Western

My Thorn Creek and Western is an imaginary short line which theoretically existed in West Virginia in 1942. . .


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/15/2005 07:21:58 AM
Message:

Dave,
Nice job on the Tichy crane. I am looking forward to some pictures of the crane tender.

Allen,
Here is a prototype photo of that Susie-Q car.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/15/2005 07:21:58 AM
Message:

Dave,
Nice job on the Tichy crane. I am looking forward to some pictures of the crane tender.

Allen,
Here is a prototype photo of that Susie-Q car.


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/15/2005 10:10:50 AM
Message:

Good Sunday Morning Bruce,

It's 7 AM here in Portlandland with a little drizzle (Where is that drenching the weather weenies said we were gonna get?) and I'm gettin' ready to meander off to church from our hotel. Thanks for the proto picture of Miss Susie-Q. If you have a higher resolution one, would you e-mail me the file? We are going to stop on the way home from church, and I am gonna have some roast duck. Maybe that will perk me up before arriving home. Got to walk fer now!

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

. . .Here is a prototype photo of that Susie-Q car. . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/15/2005 10:10:50 AM
Message:

Good Sunday Morning Bruce,

It's 7 AM here in Portlandland with a little drizzle (Where is that drenching the weather weenies said we were gonna get?) and I'm gettin' ready to meander off to church from our hotel. Thanks for the proto picture of Miss Susie-Q. If you have a higher resolution one, would you e-mail me the file? We are going to stop on the way home from church, and I am gonna have some roast duck. Maybe that will perk me up before arriving home. Got to walk fer now!

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

. . .Here is a prototype photo of that Susie-Q car. . .


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/15/2005 8:59:55 PM
Message:

Bruce
Cool pictures of the Sperry car and Susie-Q car.

Dave
Great pictures of the crane!

Here are my newest additions thanks to EBay.They are all Athearn 50' flat cars with twin trailers.



This one needs a brake wheel. I need to repair the coupler box and cover. Also change the couplers over to Kadees. And then there is weathering.







These guys need some weathering and a few small upgrades.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/15/2005 8:59:55 PM
Message:

Bruce
Cool pictures of the Sperry car and Susie-Q car.

Dave
Great pictures of the crane!

Here are my newest additions thanks to EBay.They are all Athearn 50' flat cars with twin trailers.



This one needs a brake wheel. I need to repair the coupler box and cover. Also change the couplers over to Kadees. And then there is weathering.







These guys need some weathering and a few small upgrades.


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/15/2005 11:09:31 PM
Message:

To continue...



So I realized that I'd have to scratchbuild a crane tender. Where to begin? First, I looked in my spare parts/surplus/junk box. I came up with an OLD Roundhouse metal flatcar casting and part of a plastic old-time boxcar. Here 'tis after I added end sills, a styrene deck, a scratched end with door and a Grandt ladder:



Here's a shot of the bottom:



After a lot of extra detailing, here's the result:



I tried especially hard to duplicate the chains draped along the sides. The uprights and slats were fabricated from styrene.

The deck has a lot of 'stuff' on it as was implied by the prototype photo:

The various tools lying around are etched brass. The beam that's bolted to the deck is where the 'big hook' will be chained down. This one is obviously fairly new-- otherwise it would be all 'chewed up.'



Here is a close-up of the deck:

The wood crate was frabicated from styrene. The parts inside are leftovers from the crane kit.



Finally, here is a shot of the model crane with its tender:

-Dave


Reply author: Thorn Creek and Western
Replied on: 05/15/2005 11:09:31 PM
Message:

To continue...



So I realized that I'd have to scratchbuild a crane tender. Where to begin? First, I looked in my spare parts/surplus/junk box. I came up with an OLD Roundhouse metal flatcar casting and part of a plastic old-time boxcar. Here 'tis after I added end sills, a styrene deck, a scratched end with door and a Grandt ladder:



Here's a shot of the bottom:



After a lot of extra detailing, here's the result:



I tried especially hard to duplicate the chains draped along the sides. The uprights and slats were fabricated from styrene.

The deck has a lot of 'stuff' on it as was implied by the prototype photo:

The various tools lying around are etched brass. The beam that's bolted to the deck is where the 'big hook' will be chained down. This one is obviously fairly new-- otherwise it would be all 'chewed up.'



Here is a close-up of the deck:

The wood crate was frabicated from styrene. The parts inside are leftovers from the crane kit.



Finally, here is a shot of the model crane with its tender:

-Dave


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/15/2005 11:13:14 PM
Message:

Dave,
You did a simply terrific job on that crane tender![:-thumbu][:-thumbu][:-thumbu]


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/15/2005 11:13:14 PM
Message:

Dave,
You did a simply terrific job on that crane tender![:-thumbu][:-thumbu][:-thumbu]


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/15/2005 11:46:25 PM
Message:

Tom,

I always like your scenes and backdrops. They seem to get a lot of mileage. Good scenes do just that. I was wondering if that is an elk or horse partly showing above the train?

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by TomPM

. . .Here are my newest additions thanks to EBay.They are all Athearn 50' flat cars with twin trailers. . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/15/2005 11:46:25 PM
Message:

Tom,

I always like your scenes and backdrops. They seem to get a lot of mileage. Good scenes do just that. I was wondering if that is an elk or horse partly showing above the train?

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by TomPM

. . .Here are my newest additions thanks to EBay.They are all Athearn 50' flat cars with twin trailers. . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/15/2005 11:56:14 PM
Message:

Dave,

I second Bruce's comment, a terrific job.[:-thumbu] You certainly put a lot of thought and work into your BROWNHOIST and its tender.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Dave,
You did a simply terrific job on that crane tender![:-thumbu][:-thumbu][:-thumbu]


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/15/2005 11:56:14 PM
Message:

Dave,

I second Bruce's comment, a terrific job.[:-thumbu] You certainly put a lot of thought and work into your BROWNHOIST and its tender.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Dave,
You did a simply terrific job on that crane tender![:-thumbu][:-thumbu][:-thumbu]


Reply author: Chuck Doan
Replied on: 05/16/2005 10:28:26 AM
Message:

On3 logging Slab Car

Here are some pictures of a slab (wood block) car. Used to haul mill scraps and waste for use in donkey engines and camp stoves. Freelanced, but based heavily on a photo of a Diamond and Caldor car found in Mal Ferrell’s 1990 book on this line (page 143). 23’ long. Plan drawn with AutoCad. Uses Grandt Line hardware and NBW’s, brass wire truss rods, and Russ Simpson trucks and couplers. Brake rigging made from Grandt Line shoes, and scratchbuilt hangers. Foothill Model Works now has superb brake rigging parts that save a lot of time and look great. Wish they were made back then! For the wood parts, I used Weather-it as an undercoat, and then I wiped Floquil Boxcar Red on each board before assembly. Some truss rods, steps and grab irons were bent up to simulate hard usage. Debris made from bottlebrush tree twigs, bark and sawdust, glued over diluted white glue. One of my first ¼” scale cars.

Chuck D.








Reply author: Chuck Doan
Replied on: 05/16/2005 10:28:26 AM
Message:

On3 logging Slab Car

Here are some pictures of a slab (wood block) car. Used to haul mill scraps and waste for use in donkey engines and camp stoves. Freelanced, but based heavily on a photo of a Diamond and Caldor car found in Mal Ferrell’s 1990 book on this line (page 143). 23’ long. Plan drawn with AutoCad. Uses Grandt Line hardware and NBW’s, brass wire truss rods, and Russ Simpson trucks and couplers. Brake rigging made from Grandt Line shoes, and scratchbuilt hangers. Foothill Model Works now has superb brake rigging parts that save a lot of time and look great. Wish they were made back then! For the wood parts, I used Weather-it as an undercoat, and then I wiped Floquil Boxcar Red on each board before assembly. Some truss rods, steps and grab irons were bent up to simulate hard usage. Debris made from bottlebrush tree twigs, bark and sawdust, glued over diluted white glue. One of my first ¼” scale cars.

Chuck D.








Reply author: rckwallaby
Replied on: 05/16/2005 10:51:56 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Chuck Doan

On3 logging Slab Car

Here are some pictures of a slab (wood block) car.
Chuck D.



Chuck,
That is one damm fine piece of modelling.

Cheers
Phil


Reply author: rckwallaby
Replied on: 05/16/2005 10:51:56 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by Chuck Doan

On3 logging Slab Car

Here are some pictures of a slab (wood block) car.
Chuck D.



Chuck,
That is one damm fine piece of modelling.

Cheers
Phil


Reply author: Chuck Doan
Replied on: 05/16/2005 11:18:33 AM
Message:

Thanks, Phil. Bruce, sorry for the big pictures!
My software allows me to resize to under 80K, but it doesn't tell me the dimensions. Let me know if I need to fix these.
Chuck D.


Reply author: Chuck Doan
Replied on: 05/16/2005 11:18:33 AM
Message:

Thanks, Phil. Bruce, sorry for the big pictures!
My software allows me to resize to under 80K, but it doesn't tell me the dimensions. Let me know if I need to fix these.
Chuck D.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/16/2005 11:34:18 AM
Message:

Dave
Great looking tender!

Chuck
That car is a model!? Awesome!


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/16/2005 11:34:18 AM
Message:

Dave
Great looking tender!

Chuck
That car is a model!? Awesome!


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/16/2005 11:38:01 AM
Message:

Chuck,
That is some impressive modeling! I will resize the pictures tonight unless Mike gets to it first.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/16/2005 11:38:01 AM
Message:

Chuck,
That is some impressive modeling! I will resize the pictures tonight unless Mike gets to it first.


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/17/2005 12:00:25 AM
Message:

Some great looking cars, guys. Extremely nice modeling and very realistic to boot![:-thumbu][:-thumbu]



Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/17/2005 12:00:25 AM
Message:

Some great looking cars, guys. Extremely nice modeling and very realistic to boot![:-thumbu][:-thumbu]



Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/17/2005 12:04:41 PM
Message:

Here are a couple of my favorite rolling stock. Not long ago, I latched on to these fire-fighting cars from Georgia Pacific for my N&W Maintenance of Way train. I changed the number on one of them (noticeable) and spruced them up with some detail paint. I have yet to find the boxes they came in, so maybe someone can help me out as far as who manufactured them.





Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/17/2005 12:04:41 PM
Message:

Here are a couple of my favorite rolling stock. Not long ago, I latched on to these fire-fighting cars from Georgia Pacific for my N&W Maintenance of Way train. I changed the number on one of them (noticeable) and spruced them up with some detail paint. I have yet to find the boxes they came in, so maybe someone can help me out as far as who manufactured them.





Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!


Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 05/17/2005 4:13:20 PM
Message:

Larger scale narrow gauge cars are really great to work on. This Grandt Line kit came with a warped floor and roof so I decided to work with it and incorporate the look into the rest of the car. I scored 'n chewed up the ends of the floor boards at the door to simulate typical hoof wear at that point. I weathered the car using pastel chalks worked into the flat lacquer coating and washed down a bit with alcohol and water.




Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 05/17/2005 4:13:20 PM
Message:

Larger scale narrow gauge cars are really great to work on. This Grandt Line kit came with a warped floor and roof so I decided to work with it and incorporate the look into the rest of the car. I scored 'n chewed up the ends of the floor boards at the door to simulate typical hoof wear at that point. I weathered the car using pastel chalks worked into the flat lacquer coating and washed down a bit with alcohol and water.




Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/17/2005 4:43:51 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by anbhurst

I have yet to find the boxes they came in, so maybe someone can help me out as far as who manufactured them.





Allen, those are made by Walthers and are part of their "Trainline" series.

Russ, you did a nice job of weathering your stock car. Roughing the board ends was a good idea.[:-thumbu]


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/17/2005 4:43:51 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by anbhurst

I have yet to find the boxes they came in, so maybe someone can help me out as far as who manufactured them.





Allen, those are made by Walthers and are part of their "Trainline" series.

Russ, you did a nice job of weathering your stock car. Roughing the board ends was a good idea.[:-thumbu]


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/17/2005 4:56:53 PM
Message:

This little OVT&L gon is loaded with firewood for the blacksmith's car.




Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/17/2005 4:56:53 PM
Message:

This little OVT&L gon is loaded with firewood for the blacksmith's car.




Reply author: George D
Replied on: 05/17/2005 6:01:27 PM
Message:

You guys are posting some great pictures and fine looking models.[:-thumbu]

Mike, where does the firewood end and the car begin?

George


Reply author: George D
Replied on: 05/17/2005 6:01:27 PM
Message:

You guys are posting some great pictures and fine looking models.[:-thumbu]

Mike, where does the firewood end and the car begin?

George


Reply author: Mic Greenberg
Replied on: 05/17/2005 8:37:36 PM
Message:

Hi Mike.

I am liking your little car. Is that Brennan's Ballast I see?

Mic


Reply author: Mic Greenberg
Replied on: 05/17/2005 8:37:36 PM
Message:

Hi Mike.

I am liking your little car. Is that Brennan's Ballast I see?

Mic


Reply author: Mic Greenberg
Replied on: 05/17/2005 8:38:55 PM
Message:

Hi Chuck.

Good looking model. Who are the trucks by?

Mic


Reply author: Mic Greenberg
Replied on: 05/17/2005 8:38:55 PM
Message:

Hi Chuck.

Good looking model. Who are the trucks by?

Mic


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/17/2005 9:08:17 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by George D

Mike, where does the firewood end and the car begin?

George




There is no beginning and there is no end.... [:-hypnotized][:-crazy]

Mic, that's a mix of Highball limestone and granite ballast around some plain ol' Atlas code 100 flextrack.


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/17/2005 9:08:17 PM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by George D

Mike, where does the firewood end and the car begin?

George




There is no beginning and there is no end.... [:-hypnotized][:-crazy]

Mic, that's a mix of Highball limestone and granite ballast around some plain ol' Atlas code 100 flextrack.


Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/17/2005 10:34:40 PM
Message:

Great little car, Mike!

To answer Allen's question: The animal is a deer. You can see one of his friends at the end of the next series of pictures.

If you model the Anthracite Roads you have to move coal. If you have coal then you need hoppers!






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/17/2005 10:34:40 PM
Message:

Great little car, Mike!

To answer Allen's question: The animal is a deer. You can see one of his friends at the end of the next series of pictures.

If you model the Anthracite Roads you have to move coal. If you have coal then you need hoppers!






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/17/2005 10:36:52 PM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/17/2005 10:36:52 PM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/17/2005 10:39:11 PM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/17/2005 10:39:11 PM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/17/2005 10:42:00 PM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/17/2005 10:42:00 PM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/17/2005 10:44:02 PM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/17/2005 10:44:02 PM
Message:






Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/17/2005 10:46:47 PM
Message:








Reply author: TomPM
Replied on: 05/17/2005 10:46:47 PM
Message:








Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/17/2005 11:10:45 PM
Message:

Mike, I feel compelled to use the "c" word again to describe the little gon. Very nice modeling!

Tom, another great sequence of pictures. I love your coal loads.[:-thumbu]


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/17/2005 11:10:45 PM
Message:

Mike, I feel compelled to use the "c" word again to describe the little gon. Very nice modeling!

Tom, another great sequence of pictures. I love your coal loads.[:-thumbu]


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/18/2005 07:22:35 AM
Message:

This classic covered hopper was sitting in the Suffern, NY yard yesterday. I always enjoy seeing a remnant from a fallen flag.



I have always liked the D&H herald.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/18/2005 07:22:35 AM
Message:

This classic covered hopper was sitting in the Suffern, NY yard yesterday. I always enjoy seeing a remnant from a fallen flag.



I have always liked the D&H herald.


Reply author: Chuck Doan
Replied on: 05/18/2005 10:25:43 AM
Message:

Good morning Mic,
The trucks are Russ Simpson 3'-7" Westside items (I think still available). On the first versions, he supplied brass spring stock to be cut and installed individually. I liked seeing light through the springs. He later change to castings (yuk). I mostly scratched the brakes from wood and styrene with GL shoes. I would use Foothill Model Works version today.

Chuck D.


Reply author: Chuck Doan
Replied on: 05/18/2005 10:25:43 AM
Message:

Good morning Mic,
The trucks are Russ Simpson 3'-7" Westside items (I think still available). On the first versions, he supplied brass spring stock to be cut and installed individually. I liked seeing light through the springs. He later change to castings (yuk). I mostly scratched the brakes from wood and styrene with GL shoes. I would use Foothill Model Works version today.

Chuck D.


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/18/2005 10:27:21 AM
Message:

Tom, that's an outstanding roster you've got there! And each car so nicely weathered.![:-thumbu]

Bruce, if you enjoy seeing fallen flag remnants, you'd be in 7th heaven around here! Only in our case, it's more like "gobbled up" flags along the UP's mainline... SP, MoPac.... you name it and it's in one train or another.


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/18/2005 10:27:21 AM
Message:

Tom, that's an outstanding roster you've got there! And each car so nicely weathered.![:-thumbu]

Bruce, if you enjoy seeing fallen flag remnants, you'd be in 7th heaven around here! Only in our case, it's more like "gobbled up" flags along the UP's mainline... SP, MoPac.... you name it and it's in one train or another.


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/18/2005 10:31:41 AM
Message:

I know some of you have seen this photo umpteen times already, but it's one of my personal favorites. So here it is again.





Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/18/2005 10:31:41 AM
Message:

I know some of you have seen this photo umpteen times already, but it's one of my personal favorites. So here it is again.





Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 05/18/2005 10:59:54 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

I know some of you have seen this photo umpteen times already, but it's one of my personal favorites. So here it is again.


I feel a bit out in the weeds because of my home computer failure and I haven't been able to post photos of some of my recent projects. In the spirit of Mike's post, here's another Grandt Line On3 kit that I put together. There's also an interior kit that was/is available for it, but I really built this for shelf display. I used the same weathering process on it as the C&S stock car making certain that the windows were prototypically filthy. Unfortunately, the standard black disc C&S herald decals with the white circular outline and white letters fell apart while experimenting with the weathering. The lettering here is the old style C&S lettering. I also have a Gramps On3 frameless tank car that I'll post when I get the new 'puter up and operating over the weekend.




Reply author: slimrails
Replied on: 05/18/2005 10:59:54 AM
Message:

quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

I know some of you have seen this photo umpteen times already, but it's one of my personal favorites. So here it is again.


I feel a bit out in the weeds because of my home computer failure and I haven't been able to post photos of some of my recent projects. In the spirit of Mike's post, here's another Grandt Line On3 kit that I put together. There's also an interior kit that was/is available for it, but I really built this for shelf display. I used the same weathering process on it as the C&S stock car making certain that the windows were prototypically filthy. Unfortunately, the standard black disc C&S herald decals with the white circular outline and white letters fell apart while experimenting with the weathering. The lettering here is the old style C&S lettering. I also have a Gramps On3 frameless tank car that I'll post when I get the new 'puter up and operating over the weekend.




Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/20/2005 10:40:37 PM
Message:

Mike,
That combination of spilled oil and rust makes it one of my favorites also.

Russ,
That is a neat little caboose. I hope that you get your computer set up so we can see more of your rolling stock.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/20/2005 10:40:37 PM
Message:

Mike,
That combination of spilled oil and rust makes it one of my favorites also.

Russ,
That is a neat little caboose. I hope that you get your computer set up so we can see more of your rolling stock.


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/20/2005 11:02:35 PM
Message:

Mike, . .I think it's my second time; the little person on the car was a give-a-way. Wonder if he is permanently secured? This picture along with the one of your train/ trestle above the water are my favorites too.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

I know some of you have seen this photo umpteen times already, . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/20/2005 11:02:35 PM
Message:

Mike, . .I think it's my second time; the little person on the car was a give-a-way. Wonder if he is permanently secured? This picture along with the one of your train/ trestle above the water are my favorites too.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

I know some of you have seen this photo umpteen times already, . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/20/2005 11:16:39 PM
Message:

Tom,

A friend, Huh? . .I was wonderin' if you had move him since the last shot? Or if he was grazing down-hill? This one seems to be at a lower elevation than the one in the first shot.

I have decided to name your series shots the TOMCAM. Great weathering, . .Your cars look like they have been together for awhile.[:-thumbu]

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by TomPM

. . .To answer Allen's question: The animal is a deer. You can see one of his friends at the end of the next series of pictures. . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/20/2005 11:16:39 PM
Message:

Tom,

A friend, Huh? . .I was wonderin' if you had move him since the last shot? Or if he was grazing down-hill? This one seems to be at a lower elevation than the one in the first shot.

I have decided to name your series shots the TOMCAM. Great weathering, . .Your cars look like they have been together for awhile.[:-thumbu]

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by TomPM

. . .To answer Allen's question: The animal is a deer. You can see one of his friends at the end of the next series of pictures. . .


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/21/2005 06:52:41 AM
Message:

I came across this MOW crane and tender flatcar about a year ago, in Flemington, NJ. It belongs to the Black River & Western, RR.



Here, a year later, you can see that the weeds and vines are taking over.



I have a few closeups to post after I crop them.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/21/2005 06:52:41 AM
Message:

I came across this MOW crane and tender flatcar about a year ago, in Flemington, NJ. It belongs to the Black River & Western, RR.



Here, a year later, you can see that the weeds and vines are taking over.



I have a few closeups to post after I crop them.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/21/2005 06:57:02 AM
Message:

Here are some of those closeups.








Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/21/2005 06:57:02 AM
Message:

Here are some of those closeups.








Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/21/2005 1:23:19 PM
Message:

Bruce,

The vines on the boom look like wild climatis, a weed we battled for years in the Portland Metro area on the highway right-of-way. Your crane and tender would make an interesting subject to model.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Here are some of those closeups. . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/21/2005 1:23:19 PM
Message:

Bruce,

The vines on the boom look like wild climatis, a weed we battled for years in the Portland Metro area on the highway right-of-way. Your crane and tender would make an interesting subject to model.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Here are some of those closeups. . .


Reply author: George D
Replied on: 05/21/2005 8:40:26 PM
Message:

Since it's Saturday evening, I thought a picture of a beer car was appropriate. It's an Athern reefer with Clover House dry transfers. Old Frothingslosh was a brand created by Rege Cordic, who had a morning wake up show on the radio in Pittsburgh when I was growing up. He was not only a very talented radio personality, he was also a pretty fair model railroader.


Reply author: George D
Replied on: 05/21/2005 8:40:26 PM
Message:

Since it's Saturday evening, I thought a picture of a beer car was appropriate. It's an Athern reefer with Clover House dry transfers. Old Frothingslosh was a brand created by Rege Cordic, who had a morning wake up show on the radio in Pittsburgh when I was growing up. He was not only a very talented radio personality, he was also a pretty fair model railroader.


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/21/2005 10:30:02 PM
Message:

That is one nice lookin' car George.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by George D

Since it's Saturday evening, I thought a picture of a beer car was appropriate. . .


Reply author: anbhurst
Replied on: 05/21/2005 10:30:02 PM
Message:

That is one nice lookin' car George.

Allen
Modellin' the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by George D

Since it's Saturday evening, I thought a picture of a beer car was appropriate. . .


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/21/2005 11:03:14 PM
Message:

That's a great car, George. I love the "foam is on the bottom" line.

Chuck


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/21/2005 11:03:14 PM
Message:

That's a great car, George. I love the "foam is on the bottom" line.

Chuck


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/21/2005 11:15:56 PM
Message:

George, what could be better -- a billboard reefer advertising beer! I have seen the ads for Clover House Dry Transfers, but haven't tried any of them. Are they easy to work with?


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/21/2005 11:15:56 PM
Message:

George, what could be better -- a billboard reefer advertising beer! I have seen the ads for Clover House Dry Transfers, but haven't tried any of them. Are they easy to work with?


Reply author: George D
Replied on: 05/21/2005 11:35:03 PM
Message:

Bruce,

I've had a little experience with dry transfer letters before I tried the car so I didn't have any trouble with it. It really isn't all that difficult. I think that decals are easier to position because you aren't trying to see through the backing paper. That is unless it's a large piece like the white foam on the car. Then the transfer is easier since you don't have to deal with wrinkling when you try to put it in position. You have to be careful that you rub all the transfer - any part you miss will not be released from the backing paper. Fastening the transfer with masking tape at the top to act as a hinge helps correct this problem. If you miss something, flip the transfer back down and it should remain in alignment so you can burnish the offending spot.

George


Reply author: George D
Replied on: 05/21/2005 11:35:03 PM
Message:

Bruce,

I've had a little experience with dry transfer letters before I tried the car so I didn't have any trouble with it. It really isn't all that difficult. I think that decals are easier to position because you aren't trying to see through the backing paper. That is unless it's a large piece like the white foam on the car. Then the transfer is easier since you don't have to deal with wrinkling when you try to put it in position. You have to be careful that you rub all the transfer - any part you miss will not be released from the backing paper. Fastening the transfer with masking tape at the top to act as a hinge helps correct this problem. If you miss something, flip the transfer back down and it should remain in alignment so you can burnish the offending spot.

George


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/23/2005 1:02:32 PM
Message:

Here are photos of a couple more pieces of my rolling stock.


I've posted a shot of this caboose before. It is an MDC/Roundhouse model that I originally painted and lettered for the ATSF back in the early 90s. At that time, I replaced the kit tools boxes with ones I scratch built from strip and sheet styrene. I also replaced the thread with fishing line for the trust rods, added window glazing made from clear sheet styrene, Kadee #5 couplers and Kadee wheels. Last year, I repainted it for the Wyoming Valley. I also replaced the original arch bar trucks with P2K Andrews trucks, added Tichy corner grab irons to the cupola roof, Tichy brake wheels and a Gloorcraft smoke stack.


This is my latest acquisition. It's a Proto 1000 36' Fowler boxcar. So far, I've only added Kadee #58 couplers and painted the wheels. I plan on replacing the ACF trucks with arch bar trucks and weathering it.


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/23/2005 1:02:32 PM
Message:

Here are photos of a couple more pieces of my rolling stock.


I've posted a shot of this caboose before. It is an MDC/Roundhouse model that I originally painted and lettered for the ATSF back in the early 90s. At that time, I replaced the kit tools boxes with ones I scratch built from strip and sheet styrene. I also replaced the thread with fishing line for the trust rods, added window glazing made from clear sheet styrene, Kadee #5 couplers and Kadee wheels. Last year, I repainted it for the Wyoming Valley. I also replaced the original arch bar trucks with P2K Andrews trucks, added Tichy corner grab irons to the cupola roof, Tichy brake wheels and a Gloorcraft smoke stack.


This is my latest acquisition. It's a Proto 1000 36' Fowler boxcar. So far, I've only added Kadee #58 couplers and painted the wheels. I plan on replacing the ACF trucks with arch bar trucks and weathering it.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/23/2005 1:44:44 PM
Message:

Eric,
That caboose came great. It is amazing what a difference some added detail makes!


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/23/2005 1:44:44 PM
Message:

Eric,
That caboose came great. It is amazing what a difference some added detail makes!


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/23/2005 1:56:16 PM
Message:

Nicely done, Eric!

Chuck


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/23/2005 1:56:16 PM
Message:

Nicely done, Eric!

Chuck


Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/23/2005 4:16:42 PM
Message:

I'm just getting caught up with this thread after having been gone most of the weekend. Some more really good photos of some very interesting cars have been added since last week.

George, thanks for the tip on the masking tape "hinge." [:-thumbu]

And thanks for the compliments, everyone.




Reply author: MikeC
Replied on: 05/23/2005 4:16:42 PM
Message:

I'm just getting caught up with this thread after having been gone most of the weekend. Some more really good photos of some very interesting cars have been added since last week.

George, thanks for the tip on the masking tape "hinge." [:-thumbu]

And thanks for the compliments, everyone.




Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 05/23/2005 5:06:08 PM
Message:

Hi Gang,

Before the gallery closes out, I thought I'd include a couple more pics of the passenger car variety of rolling stock, uniquely Southern version.


Here's a classic "Mixed Train Daily" on the Louisville & Wadley RR circa 1954. The loco is a classic Bachmann, er, Baldwin 4-6-0 , followed by a GM&O boxcar, and trailed by a steel Harriman style center door combine. This is big time short line railroading at its best!


This is my representation of the combine, kitbashed from an Athearn round roof coach and clerestory bagage car, and lettered for my Georgia Southern RR. It's not exact but gets the effect across. BTW, the church in the background is a 3/4 scale scratchbuilt modelof the Campbell Iowa School House (currently at Knotts Berry Farm), which I kitbashed into a church.


Reply author: leeflan
Replied on: 05/23/2005 5:06:08 PM
Message:

Hi Gang,

Before the gallery closes out, I thought I'd include a couple more pics of the passenger car variety of rolling stock, uniquely Southern version.


Here's a classic "Mixed Train Daily" on the Louisville & Wadley RR circa 1954. The loco is a classic Bachmann, er, Baldwin 4-6-0 , followed by a GM&O boxcar, and trailed by a steel Harriman style center door combine. This is big time short line railroading at its best!


This is my representation of the combine, kitbashed from an Athearn round roof coach and clerestory bagage car, and lettered for my Georgia Southern RR. It's not exact but gets the effect across. BTW, the church in the background is a 3/4 scale scratchbuilt modelof the Campbell Iowa School House (currently at Knotts Berry Farm), which I kitbashed into a church.


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/23/2005 5:47:30 PM
Message:

Dutchman and Chuck, thanks for the compliments.

Steve,
Excellent job on the combine.


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/23/2005 5:47:30 PM
Message:

Dutchman and Chuck, thanks for the compliments.

Steve,
Excellent job on the combine.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/24/2005 06:45:52 AM
Message:

Steve,
I agree that your combine captures the essence of the prototype car. Nice job!


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/24/2005 06:45:52 AM
Message:

Steve,
I agree that your combine captures the essence of the prototype car. Nice job!


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/31/2005 11:27:46 AM
Message:

Since this is the last day for this thread, I thought I'd post a couple of additional photos.


This is a Bowser H21 70 ton hopper, that I back dated by replacing the AB brake with a Tichy KD brake and replacing the molded grab irons on the ends and the lower ladders on the sides with wire grab irons. I also added Jaybee wheels, additional weight and an a CM Car Shops coal load.


This is an Accurail USRA 55 ton hopper. I replaced the AB brake with a Tichy KD brake, Intermountain wheels, additional weight and a CM Car Shops coal load.


Reply author: Eric Norris
Replied on: 05/31/2005 11:27:46 AM
Message:

Since this is the last day for this thread, I thought I'd post a couple of additional photos.


This is a Bowser H21 70 ton hopper, that I back dated by replacing the AB brake with a Tichy KD brake and replacing the molded grab irons on the ends and the lower ladders on the sides with wire grab irons. I also added Jaybee wheels, additional weight and an a CM Car Shops coal load.


This is an Accurail USRA 55 ton hopper. I replaced the AB brake with a Tichy KD brake, Intermountain wheels, additional weight and a CM Car Shops coal load.


Reply author: JBL
Replied on: 05/31/2005 11:54:52 AM
Message:

Hi,
its time to show my latest piece of Fn3 (1:20.3) rolling stock. Its entirely scratchbuilt (except the wheels of course)from plans out of the Gazette.

I made a prototype from styrene and then silicone molds for each part. So I can duplicate the logging truck later. What you see on the pics is one of those resin-copies.







Regards,
Jens,
Germany


Reply author: JBL
Replied on: 05/31/2005 11:54:52 AM
Message:

Hi,
its time to show my latest piece of Fn3 (1:20.3) rolling stock. Its entirely scratchbuilt (except the wheels of course)from plans out of the Gazette.

I made a prototype from styrene and then silicone molds for each part. So I can duplicate the logging truck later. What you see on the pics is one of those resin-copies.







Regards,
Jens,
Germany


Reply author: lab-dad
Replied on: 05/31/2005 12:01:30 PM
Message:

Well since I finally finished the set of 3 pairs of these, and Jens posted his, and this is the last day....
Here are my scratch built On30 disconnects (based on B'man #2904 trucks)







Mj


Reply author: lab-dad
Replied on: 05/31/2005 12:01:30 PM
Message:

Well since I finally finished the set of 3 pairs of these, and Jens posted his, and this is the last day....
Here are my scratch built On30 disconnects (based on B'man #2904 trucks)







Mj


Reply author: jatravia
Replied on: 05/31/2005 12:23:19 PM
Message:

Mj and Jens - both your efforts are great.

Jens I am wondering how you broke down the parts for casting. For example the, the bearing frames (I am making an assumption about what to call them) with the LEW embossed on them: are they separate resin castings as well? What is the their thinkness (to help me with a better idea of scale)? I really think the over all look is great.

Mj - what materials did you use?

Joe <><


Reply author: jatravia
Replied on: 05/31/2005 12:23:19 PM
Message:

Mj and Jens - both your efforts are great.

Jens I am wondering how you broke down the parts for casting. For example the, the bearing frames (I am making an assumption about what to call them) with the LEW embossed on them: are they separate resin castings as well? What is the their thinkness (to help me with a better idea of scale)? I really think the over all look is great.

Mj - what materials did you use?

Joe <><


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/31/2005 12:34:28 PM
Message:

Eric, Jens and Marty,
Thanks for those posts. Jens and Marty, those scratchbuilt disconnects look great!


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 05/31/2005 12:34:28 PM
Message:

Eric, Jens and Marty,
Thanks for those posts. Jens and Marty, those scratchbuilt disconnects look great!


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/31/2005 12:43:41 PM
Message:

Very nice disconnects, Jens and Marty! I never knew a bar was used to connect pairs of these. I always thought the load served as the connection.

Eric, Nice hoppers. You can never have anough of those in the Wyoming Valley!

Chuck


Reply author: wvrr
Replied on: 05/31/2005 12:43:41 PM
Message:

Very nice disconnects, Jens and Marty! I never knew a bar was used to connect pairs of these. I always thought the load served as the connection.

Eric, Nice hoppers. You can never have anough of those in the Wyoming Valley!

Chuck


Reply author: bpate
Replied on: 05/31/2005 12:44:50 PM
Message:

It's been a great month of photos everyone. I haven't had much of a chance for posting this month but here is one just before the bell goes.


Reply author: bpate
Replied on: 05/31/2005 12:44:50 PM
Message:

It's been a great month of photos everyone. I haven't had much of a chance for posting this month but here is one just before the bell goes.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 06/01/2005 11:10:55 AM
Message:

Well, May has come and gone, andit is time to close this month's Photo Gallery. I want to thank all who posted the great photos of rolling stock this month, and all who either visited the Gallery or responded to the posts. Thanks also to Mike for suggesting this month's theme. It was a good one.


Reply author: Dutchman
Replied on: 06/01/2005 11:10:55 AM
Message:

Well, May has come and gone, andit is time to close this month's Photo Gallery. I want to thank all who posted the great photos of rolling stock this month, and all who either visited the Gallery or responded to the posts. Thanks also to Mike for suggesting this month's theme. It was a good one.


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